100 nm scale low-noise sensors based on aligned carbon nanotube networks: Overcoming the fundamental limitation of network-based sensors

Minbaek Lee, Joohyung Lee, Tae Hyun Kim, Hyungwoo Lee, Byung Yang Lee, June Park, Young Min Jhon, Maeng Je Seong, Seunghun Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanoscale sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks have been considered impractical due to several fundamental limitations such as a poor sensitivity and small signal-to-noise ratio. Herein, we present a strategy to overcome these fundamental problems and build highly-sensitive low-noise nanoscale sensors simply by controlling the structure of the SWNT networks. In this strategy, we prepared nanoscale width channels based on aligned SWNT networks using a directed assembly strategy. Significantly, the aligned network-based sensors with narrower channels exhibited even better signal-to-noise ratio than those with wider channels, which is opposite to conventional random network-based sensors. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated 100nm scale low-noise sensors to detect mercury ions with the detection limit of ∼1pM, which is superior to any state-of-the-art portable detection system and is below the allowable limit of mercury ions in drinking water set by most government environmental protection agencies. This is the first demonstration of 100nm scale low-noise sensors based on SWNT networks. Considering the increased interests in high-density sensor arrays for healthcare and environmental protection, our strategy should have a significant impact on various industrial applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number055504
JournalNanotechnology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jan 18
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
Noise
Carbon nanotubes
Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN)
Sensors
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Mercury
Ions
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Signal to noise ratio
Conservation of Natural Resources
Drinking Water
Limit of Detection
Environmental Protection Agency
Sensor arrays
Environmental protection
Delivery of Health Care
Potable water
Industrial applications
Demonstrations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

100 nm scale low-noise sensors based on aligned carbon nanotube networks : Overcoming the fundamental limitation of network-based sensors. / Lee, Minbaek; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Hyungwoo; Lee, Byung Yang; Park, June; Jhon, Young Min; Seong, Maeng Je; Hong, Seunghun.

In: Nanotechnology, Vol. 21, No. 5, 055504, 18.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Minbaek ; Lee, Joohyung ; Kim, Tae Hyun ; Lee, Hyungwoo ; Lee, Byung Yang ; Park, June ; Jhon, Young Min ; Seong, Maeng Je ; Hong, Seunghun. / 100 nm scale low-noise sensors based on aligned carbon nanotube networks : Overcoming the fundamental limitation of network-based sensors. In: Nanotechnology. 2010 ; Vol. 21, No. 5.
@article{b43458b8ce0f4dcc90647b0b18df4afe,
title = "100 nm scale low-noise sensors based on aligned carbon nanotube networks: Overcoming the fundamental limitation of network-based sensors",
abstract = "Nanoscale sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks have been considered impractical due to several fundamental limitations such as a poor sensitivity and small signal-to-noise ratio. Herein, we present a strategy to overcome these fundamental problems and build highly-sensitive low-noise nanoscale sensors simply by controlling the structure of the SWNT networks. In this strategy, we prepared nanoscale width channels based on aligned SWNT networks using a directed assembly strategy. Significantly, the aligned network-based sensors with narrower channels exhibited even better signal-to-noise ratio than those with wider channels, which is opposite to conventional random network-based sensors. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated 100nm scale low-noise sensors to detect mercury ions with the detection limit of ∼1pM, which is superior to any state-of-the-art portable detection system and is below the allowable limit of mercury ions in drinking water set by most government environmental protection agencies. This is the first demonstration of 100nm scale low-noise sensors based on SWNT networks. Considering the increased interests in high-density sensor arrays for healthcare and environmental protection, our strategy should have a significant impact on various industrial applications.",
author = "Minbaek Lee and Joohyung Lee and Kim, {Tae Hyun} and Hyungwoo Lee and Lee, {Byung Yang} and June Park and Jhon, {Young Min} and Seong, {Maeng Je} and Seunghun Hong",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1088/0957-4484/21/5/055504",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
journal = "Nanotechnology",
issn = "0957-4484",
publisher = "IOP Publishing Ltd.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - 100 nm scale low-noise sensors based on aligned carbon nanotube networks

T2 - Overcoming the fundamental limitation of network-based sensors

AU - Lee, Minbaek

AU - Lee, Joohyung

AU - Kim, Tae Hyun

AU - Lee, Hyungwoo

AU - Lee, Byung Yang

AU - Park, June

AU - Jhon, Young Min

AU - Seong, Maeng Je

AU - Hong, Seunghun

PY - 2010/1/18

Y1 - 2010/1/18

N2 - Nanoscale sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks have been considered impractical due to several fundamental limitations such as a poor sensitivity and small signal-to-noise ratio. Herein, we present a strategy to overcome these fundamental problems and build highly-sensitive low-noise nanoscale sensors simply by controlling the structure of the SWNT networks. In this strategy, we prepared nanoscale width channels based on aligned SWNT networks using a directed assembly strategy. Significantly, the aligned network-based sensors with narrower channels exhibited even better signal-to-noise ratio than those with wider channels, which is opposite to conventional random network-based sensors. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated 100nm scale low-noise sensors to detect mercury ions with the detection limit of ∼1pM, which is superior to any state-of-the-art portable detection system and is below the allowable limit of mercury ions in drinking water set by most government environmental protection agencies. This is the first demonstration of 100nm scale low-noise sensors based on SWNT networks. Considering the increased interests in high-density sensor arrays for healthcare and environmental protection, our strategy should have a significant impact on various industrial applications.

AB - Nanoscale sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks have been considered impractical due to several fundamental limitations such as a poor sensitivity and small signal-to-noise ratio. Herein, we present a strategy to overcome these fundamental problems and build highly-sensitive low-noise nanoscale sensors simply by controlling the structure of the SWNT networks. In this strategy, we prepared nanoscale width channels based on aligned SWNT networks using a directed assembly strategy. Significantly, the aligned network-based sensors with narrower channels exhibited even better signal-to-noise ratio than those with wider channels, which is opposite to conventional random network-based sensors. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated 100nm scale low-noise sensors to detect mercury ions with the detection limit of ∼1pM, which is superior to any state-of-the-art portable detection system and is below the allowable limit of mercury ions in drinking water set by most government environmental protection agencies. This is the first demonstration of 100nm scale low-noise sensors based on SWNT networks. Considering the increased interests in high-density sensor arrays for healthcare and environmental protection, our strategy should have a significant impact on various industrial applications.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=73949140005&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=73949140005&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1088/0957-4484/21/5/055504

DO - 10.1088/0957-4484/21/5/055504

M3 - Article

C2 - 20032552

AN - SCOPUS:73949140005

VL - 21

JO - Nanotechnology

JF - Nanotechnology

SN - 0957-4484

IS - 5

M1 - 055504

ER -