A cationic lipid emulsion/DNA complex as a physically stable and serum- resistant gene delivery system

Sun Woo Yi, Tae Young Yune, Tae Woo Kim, Hesson Chung, Young Wook Choi, Ick Chan Kwon, Eunhee Bae Lee, Seo Young Jeong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To develop a non-viral gene delivery system in the form of an oil-in-water (o/w) lipid emulsion. Method. Cationic lipid emulsions were formulated with soybean oil, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-trimethylammonium- propane (DOTAP) as a cationic emulsifier and other co-emulsifiers. The physical characteristics of the lipid emulsion and the emulsion/DNA complex were determined. The in vitro transfection efficiency of the emulsion/DNA complex was determined in the presence of up to 90% serum. Results. The average droplet size and zeta potential of emulsions were ca. 180 nm and ca. +50 mV. respectively. Among the emulsions, a stable formulation was selected to form a complex with a plasmid DNA encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. By increasing the ratio of emulsion to DNA, zeta-potential of the emulsion/DNA complex increased monotonously from negative to positive without any changes in the complex size. The complex was stable against DNase I digestion and an anionic poly-L-aspartic acid (PLAA). The complex delivered DNA into the cells successfully, and the transfection efficiency was not affected by complex formation time from 20 min to 2 h. More importantly, the cationic lipid emulsion facilitated the transfer of DNA in the presence of up to 90% serum. Conclusions. The cationic lipid emulsion/DNA complex has physical stability and serum resistant properties for gene transfer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-320
Number of pages7
JournalPharmaceutical Research
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 May 9
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gene Transfer Techniques
Emulsions
Genes
Lipids
DNA
Serum
Zeta potential
Transfection
Gene transfer
Propane
Soybean Oil
Chloramphenicol O-Acetyltransferase
Deoxyribonuclease I
Aspartic Acid
Digestion
Oils
Plasmids

Keywords

  • Cationic lipids
  • Gene transfer
  • Lipid emulsions
  • Poly(ethylene glycol)
  • Transfection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

A cationic lipid emulsion/DNA complex as a physically stable and serum- resistant gene delivery system. / Yi, Sun Woo; Yune, Tae Young; Kim, Tae Woo; Chung, Hesson; Choi, Young Wook; Kwon, Ick Chan; Lee, Eunhee Bae; Jeong, Seo Young.

In: Pharmaceutical Research, Vol. 17, No. 3, 09.05.2000, p. 314-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yi, Sun Woo ; Yune, Tae Young ; Kim, Tae Woo ; Chung, Hesson ; Choi, Young Wook ; Kwon, Ick Chan ; Lee, Eunhee Bae ; Jeong, Seo Young. / A cationic lipid emulsion/DNA complex as a physically stable and serum- resistant gene delivery system. In: Pharmaceutical Research. 2000 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 314-320.
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AU - Kwon, Ick Chan

AU - Lee, Eunhee Bae

AU - Jeong, Seo Young

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