A cross-country comparison of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among youth who are employed, in school or out of the labor force and school (OLFS)

Jelani Kerr, Anita Minh, Arjumand Siddiqi, Carles Muntaner, Patricia O’Campo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Labor force and school attachment may influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use in the US and Canada. Differences in social welfare provision, which provide protections for individuals with insecure attachments to the labor force or education, may in turn impact the behavior and health of youth in these countries. Yet, there is little research to understand the health consequences for youth of being out of the labor force and school (OLFS). Data of 25–29 year old participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (year 2010) and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2009–2010) were used to examine differences in substance use by labor force and school attachment. Logistic regression suggests that OLFS in the US and Canada were less likely to report alcohol uptake and more likely to use tobacco compared to employed youth. Unemployment was differentially associated with substance use behaviors by country. Country of residence and subsequent exposure to social welfare policy does not appear to impact substance use behaviors among OLFS. However, associations of unemployment and gender by country indicates differences in substance use behavior. More research should seek to understand factors that influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among OLFS and unemployed youth.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Youth Studies
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

labor force
nicotine
alcohol
school
social welfare
unemployment
Canada
health consequences
health
social policy
logistics
regression
gender
community
education

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • drugs
  • labor market
  • NEET
  • OLFS
  • Schooling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

A cross-country comparison of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among youth who are employed, in school or out of the labor force and school (OLFS). / Kerr, Jelani; Minh, Anita; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Muntaner, Carles; O’Campo, Patricia.

In: Journal of Youth Studies, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cf5386c4709a4b3381133f4231c93606,
title = "A cross-country comparison of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among youth who are employed, in school or out of the labor force and school (OLFS)",
abstract = "Labor force and school attachment may influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use in the US and Canada. Differences in social welfare provision, which provide protections for individuals with insecure attachments to the labor force or education, may in turn impact the behavior and health of youth in these countries. Yet, there is little research to understand the health consequences for youth of being out of the labor force and school (OLFS). Data of 25–29 year old participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (year 2010) and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2009–2010) were used to examine differences in substance use by labor force and school attachment. Logistic regression suggests that OLFS in the US and Canada were less likely to report alcohol uptake and more likely to use tobacco compared to employed youth. Unemployment was differentially associated with substance use behaviors by country. Country of residence and subsequent exposure to social welfare policy does not appear to impact substance use behaviors among OLFS. However, associations of unemployment and gender by country indicates differences in substance use behavior. More research should seek to understand factors that influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among OLFS and unemployed youth.",
keywords = "alcohol, drugs, labor market, NEET, OLFS, Schooling",
author = "Jelani Kerr and Anita Minh and Arjumand Siddiqi and Carles Muntaner and Patricia O’Campo",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/13676261.2018.1529862",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Youth Studies",
issn = "1367-6261",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A cross-country comparison of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among youth who are employed, in school or out of the labor force and school (OLFS)

AU - Kerr, Jelani

AU - Minh, Anita

AU - Siddiqi, Arjumand

AU - Muntaner, Carles

AU - O’Campo, Patricia

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Labor force and school attachment may influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use in the US and Canada. Differences in social welfare provision, which provide protections for individuals with insecure attachments to the labor force or education, may in turn impact the behavior and health of youth in these countries. Yet, there is little research to understand the health consequences for youth of being out of the labor force and school (OLFS). Data of 25–29 year old participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (year 2010) and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2009–2010) were used to examine differences in substance use by labor force and school attachment. Logistic regression suggests that OLFS in the US and Canada were less likely to report alcohol uptake and more likely to use tobacco compared to employed youth. Unemployment was differentially associated with substance use behaviors by country. Country of residence and subsequent exposure to social welfare policy does not appear to impact substance use behaviors among OLFS. However, associations of unemployment and gender by country indicates differences in substance use behavior. More research should seek to understand factors that influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among OLFS and unemployed youth.

AB - Labor force and school attachment may influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use in the US and Canada. Differences in social welfare provision, which provide protections for individuals with insecure attachments to the labor force or education, may in turn impact the behavior and health of youth in these countries. Yet, there is little research to understand the health consequences for youth of being out of the labor force and school (OLFS). Data of 25–29 year old participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (year 2010) and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2009–2010) were used to examine differences in substance use by labor force and school attachment. Logistic regression suggests that OLFS in the US and Canada were less likely to report alcohol uptake and more likely to use tobacco compared to employed youth. Unemployment was differentially associated with substance use behaviors by country. Country of residence and subsequent exposure to social welfare policy does not appear to impact substance use behaviors among OLFS. However, associations of unemployment and gender by country indicates differences in substance use behavior. More research should seek to understand factors that influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among OLFS and unemployed youth.

KW - alcohol

KW - drugs

KW - labor market

KW - NEET

KW - OLFS

KW - Schooling

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054658146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054658146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13676261.2018.1529862

DO - 10.1080/13676261.2018.1529862

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85054658146

JO - Journal of Youth Studies

JF - Journal of Youth Studies

SN - 1367-6261

ER -