A Meta-Analysis of Pulmonary Function With Pulsatile Perfusion in Cardiac Surgery

Choon Hak Lim, Myung Ji Nam, Ji Sung Lee, Hyun Jung Kim, Ji Yeon Kim, Hye Won Shin, Hye Won Lee, Kyung Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether pulsatile or nonpulsatile perfusion had a greater effect on pulmonary dysfunction in randomized controlled trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were used to identify available articles published before April 13, 2013. A meta-analysis was conducted on the effects of pulsatile perfusion on postoperative pulmonary function, intubation time, and the lengths of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stays. Eight studies involving 474 patients who received pulsatile perfusion and 496 patients who received nonpulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were considered in the meta-analysis. Patients receiving pulsatile perfusion had a significantly greater PaO2/FiO2 ratio 24h and 48h post-operation (P<0.00001, both) and significantly lower chest radiograph scores at 24h and 48h post-operation (P<0.00001 and P=0.001, respectively) compared with patients receiving nonpulsatile perfusion. The incidence of noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory insufficiency was significantly lower (P<0.00001), and intubation time and ICU and hospital stays were shorter (P=0.004, P<0.00001, and P<0.00001, respectively) in patients receiving pulsatile perfusion during CPB compared with patients receiving nonpulsatile perfusion. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggests that the use of pulsatile flow during CPB results in better postoperative pulmonary function and shorter ICU and hospital stays.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-117
Number of pages8
JournalArtificial Organs
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Pulsatile Flow
Intensive care units
Surgery
Thoracic Surgery
Meta-Analysis
Lung
Perfusion
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Intensive Care Units
Pulsatile flow
Length of Stay
Intubation
Ventilation
Noninvasive Ventilation
MEDLINE
Respiratory Insufficiency
Thorax
Randomized Controlled Trials
Incidence

Keywords

  • Cardiopulmonary bypass
  • Meta-analysis
  • Pulsatile perfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

A Meta-Analysis of Pulmonary Function With Pulsatile Perfusion in Cardiac Surgery. / Lim, Choon Hak; Nam, Myung Ji; Lee, Ji Sung; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Shin, Hye Won; Lee, Hye Won; Sun, Kyung.

In: Artificial Organs, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 110-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lim, Choon Hak ; Nam, Myung Ji ; Lee, Ji Sung ; Kim, Hyun Jung ; Kim, Ji Yeon ; Shin, Hye Won ; Lee, Hye Won ; Sun, Kyung. / A Meta-Analysis of Pulmonary Function With Pulsatile Perfusion in Cardiac Surgery. In: Artificial Organs. 2015 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 110-117.
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