A Prospective Study about Abnormal Ductal Dilatations without Associated Masses on Breast US. What is the Significance for us?

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Abstract

Rationale and Objectives: Ductal changes are described as a finding of surrounding tissues in breast masses according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System - Ultrasound. However, ductal changes are often found as an isolated finding without a mass on ultrasound. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of abnormal ductal dilatations without masses on breast ultrasound. Materials and Methods: From August 2006 to August 2008, 75 pathologically verified pure ductal dilatations without associated masses on breast ultrasound were collected. Ultrasound findings including the diameter and length of the duct, the presence of ductal wall thickening and intraluminal content, the echo pattern of intraluminal content, and distribution were evaluated. The ultrasound findings were correlated with clinical and pathologic features, and radiologic differences between benign and malignant lesions were assessed using Fisher's exact tests. Results: Of the 75 cases with abnormal ductal dilatations, seven (9%) were malignant, and four (5%) were atypical ductal hyperplasia. Ductal dilatations were longer in malignancies than in benign lesions (P < .05). Ductal wall thickening was more frequent in malignancies (100%) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (50%) than in other benign lesions (3%) (P < .05). Hypoechoic intraluminal content was more common in malignancies (86%) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (50%) than in other benign lesions (8%) (P < .05). Furthermore, a segmental distribution was more frequent in malignancies (43%) than in benign lesions (1%). Clinical symptoms were also frequent in malignancies (86%) than in benign lesions (4%) (P < .05). Conclusions: Abnormal ductal dilatations without masses have a 9% malignancy rate, and these would be recommended to undergo biopsy as suspicious abnormalities according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System - Ultrasound. Ultrasound has an essential role in the assessment of abnormal ducts for distinguishing benign and malignant ductal changes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-302
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Radiology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Dilatation
Breast
Prospective Studies
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating
Neoplasms
Information Systems
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Breast
  • Breast carcinoma
  • Breast ducts
  • Breast ultrasound
  • Dilated mammary duct

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

@article{f342a926dddd453bb7d83d6690df8707,
title = "A Prospective Study about Abnormal Ductal Dilatations without Associated Masses on Breast US. What is the Significance for us?",
abstract = "Rationale and Objectives: Ductal changes are described as a finding of surrounding tissues in breast masses according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System - Ultrasound. However, ductal changes are often found as an isolated finding without a mass on ultrasound. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of abnormal ductal dilatations without masses on breast ultrasound. Materials and Methods: From August 2006 to August 2008, 75 pathologically verified pure ductal dilatations without associated masses on breast ultrasound were collected. Ultrasound findings including the diameter and length of the duct, the presence of ductal wall thickening and intraluminal content, the echo pattern of intraluminal content, and distribution were evaluated. The ultrasound findings were correlated with clinical and pathologic features, and radiologic differences between benign and malignant lesions were assessed using Fisher's exact tests. Results: Of the 75 cases with abnormal ductal dilatations, seven (9{\%}) were malignant, and four (5{\%}) were atypical ductal hyperplasia. Ductal dilatations were longer in malignancies than in benign lesions (P < .05). Ductal wall thickening was more frequent in malignancies (100{\%}) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (50{\%}) than in other benign lesions (3{\%}) (P < .05). Hypoechoic intraluminal content was more common in malignancies (86{\%}) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (50{\%}) than in other benign lesions (8{\%}) (P < .05). Furthermore, a segmental distribution was more frequent in malignancies (43{\%}) than in benign lesions (1{\%}). Clinical symptoms were also frequent in malignancies (86{\%}) than in benign lesions (4{\%}) (P < .05). Conclusions: Abnormal ductal dilatations without masses have a 9{\%} malignancy rate, and these would be recommended to undergo biopsy as suspicious abnormalities according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System - Ultrasound. Ultrasound has an essential role in the assessment of abnormal ducts for distinguishing benign and malignant ductal changes.",
keywords = "Breast, Breast carcinoma, Breast ducts, Breast ultrasound, Dilated mammary duct",
author = "Song, {Sung Eun} and Ann Yie and Seo, {Bo Kyoung} and Lee, {Seung Hwa} and Cho, {Kyu Ran} and Woo, {Ok Hee} and Lee, {Ki Yeol} and Kim, {Young Sik}",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
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doi = "10.1016/j.acra.2011.10.021",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "296--302",
journal = "Academic Radiology",
issn = "1076-6332",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
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T1 - A Prospective Study about Abnormal Ductal Dilatations without Associated Masses on Breast US. What is the Significance for us?

AU - Song, Sung Eun

AU - Yie, Ann

AU - Seo, Bo Kyoung

AU - Lee, Seung Hwa

AU - Cho, Kyu Ran

AU - Woo, Ok Hee

AU - Lee, Ki Yeol

AU - Kim, Young Sik

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - Rationale and Objectives: Ductal changes are described as a finding of surrounding tissues in breast masses according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System - Ultrasound. However, ductal changes are often found as an isolated finding without a mass on ultrasound. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of abnormal ductal dilatations without masses on breast ultrasound. Materials and Methods: From August 2006 to August 2008, 75 pathologically verified pure ductal dilatations without associated masses on breast ultrasound were collected. Ultrasound findings including the diameter and length of the duct, the presence of ductal wall thickening and intraluminal content, the echo pattern of intraluminal content, and distribution were evaluated. The ultrasound findings were correlated with clinical and pathologic features, and radiologic differences between benign and malignant lesions were assessed using Fisher's exact tests. Results: Of the 75 cases with abnormal ductal dilatations, seven (9%) were malignant, and four (5%) were atypical ductal hyperplasia. Ductal dilatations were longer in malignancies than in benign lesions (P < .05). Ductal wall thickening was more frequent in malignancies (100%) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (50%) than in other benign lesions (3%) (P < .05). Hypoechoic intraluminal content was more common in malignancies (86%) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (50%) than in other benign lesions (8%) (P < .05). Furthermore, a segmental distribution was more frequent in malignancies (43%) than in benign lesions (1%). Clinical symptoms were also frequent in malignancies (86%) than in benign lesions (4%) (P < .05). Conclusions: Abnormal ductal dilatations without masses have a 9% malignancy rate, and these would be recommended to undergo biopsy as suspicious abnormalities according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System - Ultrasound. Ultrasound has an essential role in the assessment of abnormal ducts for distinguishing benign and malignant ductal changes.

AB - Rationale and Objectives: Ductal changes are described as a finding of surrounding tissues in breast masses according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System - Ultrasound. However, ductal changes are often found as an isolated finding without a mass on ultrasound. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of abnormal ductal dilatations without masses on breast ultrasound. Materials and Methods: From August 2006 to August 2008, 75 pathologically verified pure ductal dilatations without associated masses on breast ultrasound were collected. Ultrasound findings including the diameter and length of the duct, the presence of ductal wall thickening and intraluminal content, the echo pattern of intraluminal content, and distribution were evaluated. The ultrasound findings were correlated with clinical and pathologic features, and radiologic differences between benign and malignant lesions were assessed using Fisher's exact tests. Results: Of the 75 cases with abnormal ductal dilatations, seven (9%) were malignant, and four (5%) were atypical ductal hyperplasia. Ductal dilatations were longer in malignancies than in benign lesions (P < .05). Ductal wall thickening was more frequent in malignancies (100%) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (50%) than in other benign lesions (3%) (P < .05). Hypoechoic intraluminal content was more common in malignancies (86%) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (50%) than in other benign lesions (8%) (P < .05). Furthermore, a segmental distribution was more frequent in malignancies (43%) than in benign lesions (1%). Clinical symptoms were also frequent in malignancies (86%) than in benign lesions (4%) (P < .05). Conclusions: Abnormal ductal dilatations without masses have a 9% malignancy rate, and these would be recommended to undergo biopsy as suspicious abnormalities according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System - Ultrasound. Ultrasound has an essential role in the assessment of abnormal ducts for distinguishing benign and malignant ductal changes.

KW - Breast

KW - Breast carcinoma

KW - Breast ducts

KW - Breast ultrasound

KW - Dilated mammary duct

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