A randomized clinical trial testing treatment preference and two dietary options in behavioral weight management: Preliminary results of the impact of diet at 6 months - PREFER Study

Lora E. Burke, Mindi A. Styn, Ann R. Steenkiste, Edvin Music, Melanie Warziski, Jina Choo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The PREFER study objectives were to examine potential differences in weight loss during a standard behavioral intervention between subjects assigned to one of two calorie- and fat-restricted diets [standard behavior treatment (SBT) and lacto-ovo-vegetarian ([SBT+LOV)], with or without regard to their preferred dietary treatment. This article reports the differences in outcomes between diet groups after the first 6 months of the intervention. Research Methods and Procedures: The study used a four-group design. Subjects (n = 182) were randomized to a treatment preference group and then to a dietary treatment group. For this report, preference groups were combined to permit comparisons by dietary treatment only (SBT, n = 98; SBT+LOV, n = 84). Additional analyses compared SBT+LOV subjects who were 100% adherent (did not consume any meat, fish, or poultry, n = 47) to those who were <100% adherent (n = 24). Results: Significant differences were seen in the baseline to 6-month change scores between the two groups for carbohydrate consumption (p = 0.013), protein consumption (p < 0.001), polyunsaturated-to-saturated fat ratio (p = 0.009), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) level (p = 0.013). Among SBT+LOV subjects, those who were 100% adherent experienced greater reductions in weight (p < 0.001), total cholesterol (p = 0.026), LDL-C (p = 0.034), and glucose (p = 0.002) and consumed less fat (p = 0.030) compared with those who were <100% adherent. Discussion: Differences between dietary treatment groups at 6 months were minimal, most likely because one-third of the SBT+LOV group did not follow the vegetarian diet and because both groups had the same calorie and fat restrictions. SBT+LOV subjects who were 100% adherent were more successful at both weight loss and cholesterol reduction than those who were <100% adherent, suggesting that vegetarian diets are efficacious for weight and cholesterol control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2007-2017
Number of pages11
JournalObesity
Volume14
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Nov 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Randomized Controlled Trials
Diet
Weights and Measures
Therapeutics
Vegetarian Diet
Weight Loss
Fats
Cholesterol
LDL Cholesterol
Fat-Restricted Diet
Poultry
Meat
Fishes
Carbohydrates
Glucose

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Behavioral therapy
  • Lacto-ovo-vegetarian
  • Treatment preference
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

A randomized clinical trial testing treatment preference and two dietary options in behavioral weight management : Preliminary results of the impact of diet at 6 months - PREFER Study. / Burke, Lora E.; Styn, Mindi A.; Steenkiste, Ann R.; Music, Edvin; Warziski, Melanie; Choo, Jina.

In: Obesity, Vol. 14, No. 11, 01.11.2006, p. 2007-2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burke, Lora E. ; Styn, Mindi A. ; Steenkiste, Ann R. ; Music, Edvin ; Warziski, Melanie ; Choo, Jina. / A randomized clinical trial testing treatment preference and two dietary options in behavioral weight management : Preliminary results of the impact of diet at 6 months - PREFER Study. In: Obesity. 2006 ; Vol. 14, No. 11. pp. 2007-2017.
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