A Self-Regulating Feed-Forward Circuit Controlling C. elegans Egg-Laying Behavior

Mi Zhang, Samuel H. Chung, Christopher Fang-Yen, Caroline Craig, Rex A. Kerr, Hiroshi Suzuki, Aravinthan D T Samuel, Eric Mazur, William R. Schafer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Egg laying in Caenorhabditis elegans has been well studied at the genetic and behavioral levels. However, the neural basis of egg-laying behavior is still not well understood; in particular, the roles of specific neurons and the functional nature of the synaptic connections in the egg-laying circuit remain uncharacterized. Results: We have used in vivo neuroimaging and laser surgery to address these questions in intact, behaving animals. We have found that the HSN neurons play a central role in driving egg-laying behavior through direct excitation of the vulval muscles and VC motor neurons. The VC neurons play a dual role in the egg-laying circuit, exciting the vulval muscles while feedback-inhibiting the HSNs. Interestingly, the HSNs are active in the absence of synaptic input, suggesting that egg laying may be controlled through modulation of autonomous HSN activity. Indeed, body touch appears to inhibit egg laying, in part by interfering with HSN calcium oscillations. Conclusions: The egg-laying motor circuit comprises a simple three-component system combining feed-forward excitation and feedback inhibition. This microcircuit motif is common in the C. elegans nervous system, as well as in the mammalian cortex; thus, understanding its functional properties in C. elegans may provide insight into its computational role in more complex brains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1445-1455
Number of pages11
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume18
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct 14
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurons
Ovum
oviposition
Networks (circuits)
Muscle
Caenorhabditis elegans
Laser surgery
Neuroimaging
Feedback
neurons
Neurology
Brain
Animals
laser surgery
Modulation
Behavioral Genetics
Calcium
Muscles
muscles
Calcium Signaling

Keywords

  • MOLNEURO
  • SYSNEURO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Zhang, M., Chung, S. H., Fang-Yen, C., Craig, C., Kerr, R. A., Suzuki, H., ... Schafer, W. R. (2008). A Self-Regulating Feed-Forward Circuit Controlling C. elegans Egg-Laying Behavior. Current Biology, 18(19), 1445-1455. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2008.08.047

A Self-Regulating Feed-Forward Circuit Controlling C. elegans Egg-Laying Behavior. / Zhang, Mi; Chung, Samuel H.; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Craig, Caroline; Kerr, Rex A.; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Samuel, Aravinthan D T; Mazur, Eric; Schafer, William R.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 18, No. 19, 14.10.2008, p. 1445-1455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, M, Chung, SH, Fang-Yen, C, Craig, C, Kerr, RA, Suzuki, H, Samuel, ADT, Mazur, E & Schafer, WR 2008, 'A Self-Regulating Feed-Forward Circuit Controlling C. elegans Egg-Laying Behavior', Current Biology, vol. 18, no. 19, pp. 1445-1455. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2008.08.047
Zhang M, Chung SH, Fang-Yen C, Craig C, Kerr RA, Suzuki H et al. A Self-Regulating Feed-Forward Circuit Controlling C. elegans Egg-Laying Behavior. Current Biology. 2008 Oct 14;18(19):1445-1455. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2008.08.047
Zhang, Mi ; Chung, Samuel H. ; Fang-Yen, Christopher ; Craig, Caroline ; Kerr, Rex A. ; Suzuki, Hiroshi ; Samuel, Aravinthan D T ; Mazur, Eric ; Schafer, William R. / A Self-Regulating Feed-Forward Circuit Controlling C. elegans Egg-Laying Behavior. In: Current Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 18, No. 19. pp. 1445-1455.
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