Abatement potential analysis on CO2 and size-resolved particle emissions from a downsized LPG direct injection engine for passenger car

J. Cho, Kangjin Kim, Sungha Baek, Cha Lee Myung, Simsoo Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As global warming and fine dust problem became issues, the regulation for relevant exhaust emissions has been strengthened gradually. Thus, a major challenge of automotive engineers is reducing the CO2 and particle emissions at the same time. Especially for gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines, which are widely used due to its higher fuel efficiency, an excessive particle emissions problem compared to port fuel injection system is the big nuisance. The LPG fuel, which has great fuel properties for applying this direct injection scheme, could deal with this. Also, downsized turbocharged system can reduce additional fuel consumption and CO2 emissions sequentially. In this study, a GDI passenger car and the same vehicle equipped with a downsized turbocharged liquefied petroleum gas direct injection (T-LPDi) engine were evaluated under chassis dynamometer test to verify the exhaust emission abatement capability of T-LPDi vehicle. The T-LPDi engine was developed for research use, which has dedicated fuel supply and control strategy for LPG fuel. Comparing the T-LPDi and GDI vehicles, the CO2 emissions were decreased by > 20% under the vehicle test condition, while particle number and mass emissions were decreased by > 90% and >50% from the T-LPDi vehicle respectively. These results showed a potential of T-LPDi concept as a good alternative with the environmental competitiveness, though there is room for further improvement of engine control and optimization of emission catalyst to meet more stringent future regulations.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAtmospheric Pollution Research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

liquefied petroleum gas
Liquefied petroleum gas
Direct injection
Passenger cars
automobile
engine
Particle size
particle size
Engines
exhaust emission
Gasoline
fuel consumption
competitiveness
analysis
global warming
Dust control
catalyst
vehicle
Dynamometers
Chassis

Keywords

  • CO emission
  • Direct injection (DI)
  • Downsizing
  • Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)
  • Particle emission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Abatement potential analysis on CO2 and size-resolved particle emissions from a downsized LPG direct injection engine for passenger car. / Cho, J.; Kim, Kangjin; Baek, Sungha; Myung, Cha Lee; Park, Simsoo.

In: Atmospheric Pollution Research, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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