Activation of epidermal growth factor receptors is responsible for mucin synthesis induced by cigarette smoke

Kiyoshi Takeyama, Birgit Jung, Jae Jeong Shim, Pierre Regis Burgel, Trang Dao-Pick, Iris F. Ueki, Ursula Protin, Peer Kroschel, Jay A. Nadel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

214 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mucus hypersecretion from hyperplastic airway goblet cells is a hallmark of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although cigarette smoking is thought to be involved in mucus hypersecretion in COPD, the mechanism by which cigarette smoke induces mucus overproduction is unknown. Here we show that activation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) is responsible for mucin production after inhalation of cigarette smoke in airways in vitro and in vivo. In the airway epithelial cell line NCI-H292, exposure to cigarette smoke upregulated the EGFR mRNA expression and induced activation of EGFR-specific tyrosine phosphorylation, resulting in upregulation of MUC5AC mRNA and protein production, effects that were inhibited completely by selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (BIBX1522, AG-1478) and that were decreased by antioxidants. In vivo, cigarette smoke inhalation increased MUC5AC mRNA and goblet cell production in rat airways, effects that were prevented by pretreatment with BIBX1522. These effects may explain the goblet cell hyperplasia that occurs in COPD and may provide a novel strategy for therapy in airway hypersecretory diseases.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Volume280
Issue number1 24-1
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mucins
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Goblet Cells
Mucus
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Messenger RNA
Inhalation
Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Hyperplasia
Tyrosine
Up-Regulation
Antioxidants
Smoking
Epithelial Cells
Phosphorylation
Cell Line
ErbB Receptors
Proteins

Keywords

  • Airway epithelial differentiation
  • Human goblet factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Activation of epidermal growth factor receptors is responsible for mucin synthesis induced by cigarette smoke. / Takeyama, Kiyoshi; Jung, Birgit; Shim, Jae Jeong; Burgel, Pierre Regis; Dao-Pick, Trang; Ueki, Iris F.; Protin, Ursula; Kroschel, Peer; Nadel, Jay A.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Vol. 280, No. 1 24-1, 01.01.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takeyama, Kiyoshi ; Jung, Birgit ; Shim, Jae Jeong ; Burgel, Pierre Regis ; Dao-Pick, Trang ; Ueki, Iris F. ; Protin, Ursula ; Kroschel, Peer ; Nadel, Jay A. / Activation of epidermal growth factor receptors is responsible for mucin synthesis induced by cigarette smoke. In: American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology. 2001 ; Vol. 280, No. 1 24-1.
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