Acupuncture for spasticity after stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Sung Min Lim, Junghee Yoo, Euiju Lee, Hyun Jung Kim, Seungwon Shin, Gajin Han, Hyeong Sik Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this systematic review was to determine how effective acupuncture or electroacupuncture (acupuncture with electrical stimulation) is in treating poststroke patients with spasticity. We searched publications in Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library in English, 19 accredited journals in Korean, and the China Integrated Knowledge Resources Database in Chinese through to July 30, 2013. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with no language restrictions that compared the effects of acupuncture or electroacupuncture with usual care or placebo acupuncture. The two investigators assessed the risk of bias and statistical analyses were performed. Three RCTs in English, 1 in Korean, and 1 in Chinese were included. Assessments were performed primarily with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture or electroacupuncture significantly decreased spasticity after stroke. A subgroup analysis showed that acupuncture significantly decreased wrist, knee, and elbow spasticity in poststroke patients. Heterogeneity could be explained by the differences in control, acupoints, and the duration after stroke occurrence. In conclusion, acupuncture could be effective in decreasing spasticity after stroke, but long-term studies are needed to determine the longevity of treatment effects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number870398
JournalEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 5

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Acupuncture
Meta-Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Stroke
Electroacupuncture
Acupuncture Points
Elbow
Wrist
Electric Stimulation
Libraries
Publications
China
Knee
Language
Placebos
Research Personnel
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Acupuncture for spasticity after stroke : A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. / Lim, Sung Min; Yoo, Junghee; Lee, Euiju; Kim, Hyun Jung; Shin, Seungwon; Han, Gajin; Ahn, Hyeong Sik.

In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 2015, 870398, 05.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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