Adipocytokines and ischemic stroke

Differential associations between stroke subtypes

Beom Joon Kim, Seung Hoon Lee, Wi Sun Ryu, Chi Kyung Kim, Byung Woo Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Experimental studies have indicated that adipocytokines are associated with vascular diseases with regard to the pathology of atherosclerotic plaque. We hypothesized that the strength of the associations between adipocytokines and stroke would differ between ischemic stroke subtypes. Methods: A total of 96 acute ischemic stroke patients (within 5 days from onset) and 48 non-stroke subjects were analyzed in this study. Stroke patients were comprised of 26 strokes due to large artery atherosclerosis (LAA) and 72 non-LAA strokes. Venous blood from all participants was drawn after an overnight fast, and serum levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin were measured by multiple sandwich immunoassay techniques. Results: Compared with non-LAA strokes, patients with LAA strokes had lower levels of serum adiponectin (6.4 ± 3.1 vs. 8.5 ± 3.9 μg/mL; P = 0.04), and a higher level of leptin-to-adiponectin ratio (L:A ratio; 1.6 ± 1.4 vs. 0.9 ± 0.9; P < 0.01). Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that, although none of the adipocytokines was associated with non-LAA strokes, lower adiponectin (adjusted OR, 0.79 per 1-μg/mL increase; 95% CI, 0.64-0.98), higher leptin (aOR, 1.12 per 1-ng/mL increase; 95% CI, 1.004-1.25) and higher L:A ratio (aOR, 2.93 per 1-quartile increase; 95% CI, 1.39-6.15) showed significant associations with increased odds of having LAA stroke, compared to non-stroke subjects. Conclusion: From our study, we documented that leptin and adiponectin had differential association patterns with ischemic stroke according to the stroke subtype. Careful consideration of the heterogeneity of stroke subtypes would be warranted in studying the utility of biomarkers including adipocytokines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-122
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume312
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 15
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Adipokines
Stroke
Adiponectin
Atherosclerosis
Arteries
Leptin
Resistin
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Serum
Vascular Diseases
Immunoassay

Keywords

  • Adipocytokine
  • Adiponectin
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Ischemic stroke
  • Leptin
  • Resistin
  • Stroke subtype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Adipocytokines and ischemic stroke : Differential associations between stroke subtypes. / Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Wi Sun; Kim, Chi Kyung; Yoon, Byung Woo.

In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Vol. 312, No. 1-2, 15.01.2012, p. 117-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Beom Joon ; Lee, Seung Hoon ; Ryu, Wi Sun ; Kim, Chi Kyung ; Yoon, Byung Woo. / Adipocytokines and ischemic stroke : Differential associations between stroke subtypes. In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 2012 ; Vol. 312, No. 1-2. pp. 117-122.
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abstract = "Objective: Experimental studies have indicated that adipocytokines are associated with vascular diseases with regard to the pathology of atherosclerotic plaque. We hypothesized that the strength of the associations between adipocytokines and stroke would differ between ischemic stroke subtypes. Methods: A total of 96 acute ischemic stroke patients (within 5 days from onset) and 48 non-stroke subjects were analyzed in this study. Stroke patients were comprised of 26 strokes due to large artery atherosclerosis (LAA) and 72 non-LAA strokes. Venous blood from all participants was drawn after an overnight fast, and serum levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin were measured by multiple sandwich immunoassay techniques. Results: Compared with non-LAA strokes, patients with LAA strokes had lower levels of serum adiponectin (6.4 ± 3.1 vs. 8.5 ± 3.9 μg/mL; P = 0.04), and a higher level of leptin-to-adiponectin ratio (L:A ratio; 1.6 ± 1.4 vs. 0.9 ± 0.9; P < 0.01). Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that, although none of the adipocytokines was associated with non-LAA strokes, lower adiponectin (adjusted OR, 0.79 per 1-μg/mL increase; 95{\%} CI, 0.64-0.98), higher leptin (aOR, 1.12 per 1-ng/mL increase; 95{\%} CI, 1.004-1.25) and higher L:A ratio (aOR, 2.93 per 1-quartile increase; 95{\%} CI, 1.39-6.15) showed significant associations with increased odds of having LAA stroke, compared to non-stroke subjects. Conclusion: From our study, we documented that leptin and adiponectin had differential association patterns with ischemic stroke according to the stroke subtype. Careful consideration of the heterogeneity of stroke subtypes would be warranted in studying the utility of biomarkers including adipocytokines.",
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AB - Objective: Experimental studies have indicated that adipocytokines are associated with vascular diseases with regard to the pathology of atherosclerotic plaque. We hypothesized that the strength of the associations between adipocytokines and stroke would differ between ischemic stroke subtypes. Methods: A total of 96 acute ischemic stroke patients (within 5 days from onset) and 48 non-stroke subjects were analyzed in this study. Stroke patients were comprised of 26 strokes due to large artery atherosclerosis (LAA) and 72 non-LAA strokes. Venous blood from all participants was drawn after an overnight fast, and serum levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin were measured by multiple sandwich immunoassay techniques. Results: Compared with non-LAA strokes, patients with LAA strokes had lower levels of serum adiponectin (6.4 ± 3.1 vs. 8.5 ± 3.9 μg/mL; P = 0.04), and a higher level of leptin-to-adiponectin ratio (L:A ratio; 1.6 ± 1.4 vs. 0.9 ± 0.9; P < 0.01). Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that, although none of the adipocytokines was associated with non-LAA strokes, lower adiponectin (adjusted OR, 0.79 per 1-μg/mL increase; 95% CI, 0.64-0.98), higher leptin (aOR, 1.12 per 1-ng/mL increase; 95% CI, 1.004-1.25) and higher L:A ratio (aOR, 2.93 per 1-quartile increase; 95% CI, 1.39-6.15) showed significant associations with increased odds of having LAA stroke, compared to non-stroke subjects. Conclusion: From our study, we documented that leptin and adiponectin had differential association patterns with ischemic stroke according to the stroke subtype. Careful consideration of the heterogeneity of stroke subtypes would be warranted in studying the utility of biomarkers including adipocytokines.

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