Age-related alterations in mesenchymal stem cells related to shift in differentiation from osteogenic to adipogenic potential: Implication to age-associated bone diseases and defects

MiJung Kim, Chan Wha Kim, Yu Suk Choi, MinHwan Kim, ChanJeoung Park, Yousin Suh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell and gene therapy due to their intrinsic ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. The various therapeutic applications involving MSC require initial expansion and/or differentiation . in vitro prior to clinical use. However, serial passages of MSC in culture lead to decreased differentiation potential and stem cell characteristics, eventually inducing cellular aging which will limit the success of cell-based therapeutic interventions. Here we review the age-related changes that occur in MSC with a special focus on the shift of differentiation potential from osteogenic to adipogenic lineage during the MSC aging processes and how aging causes this preferential shift by oxidative stress and/or energy metabolism defect. Oxidative stress-related signals and some microRNAs affect the differentiation potential shift of MSC by directly targeting key regulatory factors such as Runx-2 or PPAR-γ, and energy metabolism pathway is involved as well. All information described here including transcription factors, microRNAs and FoxOs could be used towards development of treatment regimens for age-related bone diseases and related defects based on mutually exclusive lineage fate determination of MSC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-225
Number of pages11
JournalMechanisms of Ageing and Development
Volume133
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 May 1

Fingerprint

Bone Diseases
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Cell Aging
MicroRNAs
Energy Metabolism
Oxidative Stress
Serial Passage
Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Genetic Therapy
Transcription Factors
Stem Cells
Therapeutics
Cell Culture Techniques

Keywords

  • Adipogenesis
  • Aging
  • Cell therapy
  • Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC)
  • Osteogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Age-related alterations in mesenchymal stem cells related to shift in differentiation from osteogenic to adipogenic potential : Implication to age-associated bone diseases and defects. / Kim, MiJung; Kim, Chan Wha; Choi, Yu Suk; Kim, MinHwan; Park, ChanJeoung; Suh, Yousin.

In: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, Vol. 133, No. 5, 01.05.2012, p. 215-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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