Alterations in the occipital cortex of drug-naïve adults with major depressive disorder: A surface-based analysis of surface area and cortical thickness

Jee Soo Lee, Wooyoung Kang, Youbin Kang, Aram Kim, Kyu Man Han, Woo Suk Tae, Byung Joo Ham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective Advances in surface-based morphometric methods have allowed researchers to separate cortical volume into cortical thickness (CTh) and surface area (SA). Although CTh alterations in major depressive disorder (MDD) have been observed in numerous studies, few studies have described significant SA alterations. Our study aimed to measure patients’ SAs and to compare it with their CTh to examine whether SA exhibits alteration patterns that differ from those of CTh in drug-naïve patients with MDD. Methods A total of 71 drug-naïve MDD patients and 111 healthy controls underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging, and SA and CTh were analyzed between the groups. Results We found a smaller SA in the left superior occipital gyrus (L-SOG) in drug-naïve patients with MDD. In the CTh analysis, the bilateral fusiform gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus, left temporal superior gyrus, and right posterior cingulate showed thinner cortices in patients with MDD, while the CTh of the bilateral SOG, right straight gyrus, right posterior cingulate, and left lingual gyrus were increased. Conclusion Compared with the bilateral occipito-temporal changes in CTh, SA alterations in patients with MDD were confined to the L-SOG. These findings may improve our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms of SA alteration in relation to MDD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1025-1033
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry Investigation
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Oct

Keywords

  • Cortical thickness
  • Major depressive disorder
  • Occipital cortex
  • Surface area

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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