Analysis of spatial pattern of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on greenhouse cucumbers using dispersion index and spatial autocorrelation

Ki Jong Cho, Joon HoLee Lee, Jung Joon Park, Jong Kwan Kim, Ki Baik Uhm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies were conducted in two commercial cucumber greenhouses to examine thrips' seasonal and spatial patterns on Cheju Island, Korea, in 1996. Leaf and flower samples were taken to determine the thrips species and stage complexes inhabiting cucumber plants. Adult thrips (54-55%) were the most dominant stage on flowers and the majority of adult species was Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), whereas immature (82-84%) was the dominant stage on leaves. To determine the spatial distribution patterns of thrips, at least 63 leaf samples which were regularly spaced within a greenhouse were visually inspected from among the 1st, the 7th and the 15th leaves assigned from the top plant canopy. The leaf positions were located at 1.8, 1.0 and 0.3 m above ground level, respectively. Taylor's power law indicated that the counts of thrips on leaves were aggregated, regardless of thrips stage and leaf position. Autocorrelation analysis, which is based on the relative position of samples revealed the different spatial distribution patterns among the leaf positions. In general, the counts of thrips were nonrandomly distributed on the 7th leaf position, whereas the counts were randomly distributed on the 1st and 15th leaf positions. Correlograms suggested the presence of single or multiple gradients within the sample portion of the greenhouse, depending on thrips stage. Our results suggest that Taylor's power law cannot detect the spatial relationship in data sets accurately, and testing correlograms for significance is more accurate for describing the spatial distribution patterns of thrips.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-32
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Entomology and Zoology
Volume36
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Feb 1

Fingerprint

Frankliniella occidentalis
Thripidae
Thysanoptera
autocorrelation
cucumbers
greenhouses
leaves
spatial distribution
flowers
sampling
Korean Peninsula
immatures
canopy

Keywords

  • Autocorrelation
  • Cucumber
  • Frankliniella occidentalis
  • Moran's I
  • Taylor's power law

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Analysis of spatial pattern of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera : Thripidae) on greenhouse cucumbers using dispersion index and spatial autocorrelation. / Cho, Ki Jong; Lee, Joon HoLee; Park, Jung Joon; Kim, Jong Kwan; Uhm, Ki Baik.

In: Applied Entomology and Zoology, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.02.2001, p. 25-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5873e02a4cc644ad9a899c96d58e3d81,
title = "Analysis of spatial pattern of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on greenhouse cucumbers using dispersion index and spatial autocorrelation",
abstract = "Studies were conducted in two commercial cucumber greenhouses to examine thrips' seasonal and spatial patterns on Cheju Island, Korea, in 1996. Leaf and flower samples were taken to determine the thrips species and stage complexes inhabiting cucumber plants. Adult thrips (54-55{\%}) were the most dominant stage on flowers and the majority of adult species was Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), whereas immature (82-84{\%}) was the dominant stage on leaves. To determine the spatial distribution patterns of thrips, at least 63 leaf samples which were regularly spaced within a greenhouse were visually inspected from among the 1st, the 7th and the 15th leaves assigned from the top plant canopy. The leaf positions were located at 1.8, 1.0 and 0.3 m above ground level, respectively. Taylor's power law indicated that the counts of thrips on leaves were aggregated, regardless of thrips stage and leaf position. Autocorrelation analysis, which is based on the relative position of samples revealed the different spatial distribution patterns among the leaf positions. In general, the counts of thrips were nonrandomly distributed on the 7th leaf position, whereas the counts were randomly distributed on the 1st and 15th leaf positions. Correlograms suggested the presence of single or multiple gradients within the sample portion of the greenhouse, depending on thrips stage. Our results suggest that Taylor's power law cannot detect the spatial relationship in data sets accurately, and testing correlograms for significance is more accurate for describing the spatial distribution patterns of thrips.",
keywords = "Autocorrelation, Cucumber, Frankliniella occidentalis, Moran's I, Taylor's power law",
author = "Cho, {Ki Jong} and Lee, {Joon HoLee} and Park, {Jung Joon} and Kim, {Jong Kwan} and Uhm, {Ki Baik}",
year = "2001",
month = "2",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "25--32",
journal = "Applied Entomology and Zoology",
issn = "0003-6862",
publisher = "Springer Japan",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Analysis of spatial pattern of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera

T2 - Thripidae) on greenhouse cucumbers using dispersion index and spatial autocorrelation

AU - Cho, Ki Jong

AU - Lee, Joon HoLee

AU - Park, Jung Joon

AU - Kim, Jong Kwan

AU - Uhm, Ki Baik

PY - 2001/2/1

Y1 - 2001/2/1

N2 - Studies were conducted in two commercial cucumber greenhouses to examine thrips' seasonal and spatial patterns on Cheju Island, Korea, in 1996. Leaf and flower samples were taken to determine the thrips species and stage complexes inhabiting cucumber plants. Adult thrips (54-55%) were the most dominant stage on flowers and the majority of adult species was Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), whereas immature (82-84%) was the dominant stage on leaves. To determine the spatial distribution patterns of thrips, at least 63 leaf samples which were regularly spaced within a greenhouse were visually inspected from among the 1st, the 7th and the 15th leaves assigned from the top plant canopy. The leaf positions were located at 1.8, 1.0 and 0.3 m above ground level, respectively. Taylor's power law indicated that the counts of thrips on leaves were aggregated, regardless of thrips stage and leaf position. Autocorrelation analysis, which is based on the relative position of samples revealed the different spatial distribution patterns among the leaf positions. In general, the counts of thrips were nonrandomly distributed on the 7th leaf position, whereas the counts were randomly distributed on the 1st and 15th leaf positions. Correlograms suggested the presence of single or multiple gradients within the sample portion of the greenhouse, depending on thrips stage. Our results suggest that Taylor's power law cannot detect the spatial relationship in data sets accurately, and testing correlograms for significance is more accurate for describing the spatial distribution patterns of thrips.

AB - Studies were conducted in two commercial cucumber greenhouses to examine thrips' seasonal and spatial patterns on Cheju Island, Korea, in 1996. Leaf and flower samples were taken to determine the thrips species and stage complexes inhabiting cucumber plants. Adult thrips (54-55%) were the most dominant stage on flowers and the majority of adult species was Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), whereas immature (82-84%) was the dominant stage on leaves. To determine the spatial distribution patterns of thrips, at least 63 leaf samples which were regularly spaced within a greenhouse were visually inspected from among the 1st, the 7th and the 15th leaves assigned from the top plant canopy. The leaf positions were located at 1.8, 1.0 and 0.3 m above ground level, respectively. Taylor's power law indicated that the counts of thrips on leaves were aggregated, regardless of thrips stage and leaf position. Autocorrelation analysis, which is based on the relative position of samples revealed the different spatial distribution patterns among the leaf positions. In general, the counts of thrips were nonrandomly distributed on the 7th leaf position, whereas the counts were randomly distributed on the 1st and 15th leaf positions. Correlograms suggested the presence of single or multiple gradients within the sample portion of the greenhouse, depending on thrips stage. Our results suggest that Taylor's power law cannot detect the spatial relationship in data sets accurately, and testing correlograms for significance is more accurate for describing the spatial distribution patterns of thrips.

KW - Autocorrelation

KW - Cucumber

KW - Frankliniella occidentalis

KW - Moran's I

KW - Taylor's power law

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035256302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035256302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0035256302

VL - 36

SP - 25

EP - 32

JO - Applied Entomology and Zoology

JF - Applied Entomology and Zoology

SN - 0003-6862

IS - 1

ER -