Anti-diabetic effects of red rose flowers in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

Jae Eun Ju, Yong Hoon Joo, Namhyun Chung, Soo Yeon Chung, Sung Hee Han, Yong Kwon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic metabolic disease that is of increasing concern, because it frequently leads to complications such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Plants have been studied as a potential source for anti-diabetics to supplement dietary modifications, insulin, and other medications. The components of green tea polyphenols can be changed by processes such as browning. This processing method was applied to the red rose flower to determine whether the processed or non-processed rose flower has an anti-diabetic effect on the streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse. Aqueous extracts of processed and non-processed rose flowers were analyzed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The results show that the polyphenol content decreased with browning. The hemoglobin A1c level, an indicator of long-term diabetes, in diabetic mice after administration of extracts of browned rose flowers for 24 and 48 h were lower than those after administration of extracts of non-browned rose flowers. Moreover, the activity of aspartate transaminase, which is often high in diabetic patients, was low in all groups treated with rose flowers, whether they were non-browned or browned. Taken together, these results indicate that extracts from red rose flowers have long-term anti-diabetic effects, and that this effect is independent of the level of polyphenols in the extract.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)445-448
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Polyphenols
Streptozocin
Medical problems
Dietary supplements
Liquid chromatography
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Mass spectrometry
Hemoglobins
Insulin
Diet Therapy
Processing
Metabolic Diseases
Tea
Liquid Chromatography
Mass Spectrometry
Diabetes Mellitus
Chronic Disease
Cardiovascular Diseases
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Anti-diabetic effects of red rose flowers in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. / Ju, Jae Eun; Joo, Yong Hoon; Chung, Namhyun; Chung, Soo Yeon; Han, Sung Hee; Lee, Yong Kwon.

In: Journal of the Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry, Vol. 57, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 445-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ju, Jae Eun ; Joo, Yong Hoon ; Chung, Namhyun ; Chung, Soo Yeon ; Han, Sung Hee ; Lee, Yong Kwon. / Anti-diabetic effects of red rose flowers in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. In: Journal of the Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry. 2014 ; Vol. 57, No. 4. pp. 445-448.
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