Anxious? Depressed? You might be suffering from capitalism

Contradictory class locations and the prevalence of depression and anxiety in the USA

Seth J. Prins, Lisa M. Bates, Katherine M. Keyes, Carles Muntaner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite a well-established social gradient for many mental disorders, there is evidence that individuals near the middle of the social hierarchy suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety than those at the top or bottom. Although prevailing indicators of socioeconomic status (SES) cannot detect or easily explain such patterns, relational theories of social class, which emphasise political-economic processes and dimensions of power, might. We test whether the relational construct of contradictory class location, which embodies aspects of both ownership and labour, can explain this nonlinear pattern. Data on full-time workers from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (n = 21859) show that occupants of contradictory class locations have higher prevalence and odds of depression and anxiety than occupants of non-contradictory class locations. These findings suggest that the effects of class relations on depression and anxiety extend beyond those of SES, pointing to under-studied mechanisms in social epidemiology, for example, domination and exploitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1352-1372
Number of pages21
JournalSociology of Health and Illness
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Nov 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Capitalism
Social Class
capitalist society
Anxiety
Depression
anxiety
social status
Social Hierarchy
Ownership
mental disorder
epidemiology
Mental Disorders
domination
social class
exploitation
Epidemiology
alcohol
Alcohols
Economics
labor

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Mental health and illness
  • Social class
  • Social determinants of health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Anxious? Depressed? You might be suffering from capitalism : Contradictory class locations and the prevalence of depression and anxiety in the USA. / Prins, Seth J.; Bates, Lisa M.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Muntaner, Carles.

In: Sociology of Health and Illness, Vol. 37, No. 8, 01.11.2015, p. 1352-1372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prins, Seth J. ; Bates, Lisa M. ; Keyes, Katherine M. ; Muntaner, Carles. / Anxious? Depressed? You might be suffering from capitalism : Contradictory class locations and the prevalence of depression and anxiety in the USA. In: Sociology of Health and Illness. 2015 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 1352-1372.
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