Application of cyclic voltammetry to investigate enhanced catalytic current generation by biofilm-modified anodes of Geobacter sulfurreducens strain DL1 vs. variant strain KN400

Sarah M. Strycharz, Anthony P. Malanoski, Rachel M. Snider, Hana Yi, Derek R. Lovley, Leonard M. Tender

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

137 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A biofilm of Geobacter sulfurreducens will grow on an anode surface and catalyze the generation of an electrical current by oxidizing acetate and utilizing the anode as its metabolic terminal electron acceptor. Here we report qualitative analysis of cyclic voltammetry of anodes modified with biofilms of G. sulfurreducens strains DL1 and KN400 to predict possible rate-limiting steps in current generation. Strain KN400 generates approximately 2 to 8-fold greater current than strain DL1 depending upon the electrode material, enabling comparative electrochemical analysis to study the mechanism of current generation. This analysis is based on our recently reported electrochemical model for biofilm-catalyzed current generation expanded here to a five step model; Step 1 is mass transport of acetate, carbon dioxide and protons into and out of the biofilm, Step 2 is microbial turnover of acetate to carbon dioxide and protons, Step 3 is the non-concerted, 1-electron reduction of 8 equivalents of electron transfer (ET) mediator, Step 4 is extracellular electron transfer (EET) through the biofilm to the electrode surface, and Step 5 is the reversible oxidation of reduced mediator by the electrode. Five idealized voltammetric current vs. potential dependencies (voltammograms) are derived, one for when each step in the model is assumed to limit catalytic current. Comparison to experimental voltammetry of DL1 and KN400 biofilm-modified anodes suggests that for both strains, the microbial oxidation of acetate (Step 2) is fast compared to microbial reduction of ET mediator (Step 3), and either Step 3 or EET through the biofilm (Step 4) limits catalytic current generation. The possible limitation of catalytic current by Step 4 is consistent with proton concentration gradients observed within these biofilms and finite thicknesses achieved by these biofilms. The model presented here has been universally designed for application to biofilms other than G. sulfurreducens and could serve as a platform for future quantitative voltammetric analysis of non-corrosive anode and cathode reactions catalyzed by microorganisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)896-913
Number of pages18
JournalEnergy and Environmental Science
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Mar 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biofilms
Cyclic voltammetry
biofilm
Anodes
electron
Electrons
acetate
Acetates
Protons
electrode
Carbon Dioxide
Electrodes
Carbon dioxide
carbon dioxide
oxidation
Oxidation
qualitative analysis
Voltammetry
mass transport
Microorganisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Nuclear Energy and Engineering

Cite this

Application of cyclic voltammetry to investigate enhanced catalytic current generation by biofilm-modified anodes of Geobacter sulfurreducens strain DL1 vs. variant strain KN400. / Strycharz, Sarah M.; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Snider, Rachel M.; Yi, Hana; Lovley, Derek R.; Tender, Leonard M.

In: Energy and Environmental Science, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.03.2011, p. 896-913.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strycharz, Sarah M. ; Malanoski, Anthony P. ; Snider, Rachel M. ; Yi, Hana ; Lovley, Derek R. ; Tender, Leonard M. / Application of cyclic voltammetry to investigate enhanced catalytic current generation by biofilm-modified anodes of Geobacter sulfurreducens strain DL1 vs. variant strain KN400. In: Energy and Environmental Science. 2011 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 896-913.
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