Application of dynamic thermal imaging in a photocarcinogenesis mouse model

Yoo Sang Baek, Jaeyoung Kim, Geo Han, Chil Hwan Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: In clinical practice and experimental settings, cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions are commonly diagnosed by histopathological biopsy. However, this technique is invasive and results in functional or cosmetic defects. Dynamic thermal imaging is a non-invasive technique that quantifies the infra-red (IR) radiation emitted by a subject after the introduction of external thermal stimuli (such as heat or cold). Methods: Forty hairless albino (Crl:SKH1-hr) mice were randomised to the control group or the experimental group. The experimental group was regularly irradiated with artificial ultraviolet. Clinical photographs, immunohistochemical staining and dynamic thermal imaging results of both groups were obtained. Results: As photocarcinogenesis proceeded, faster thermal recovery to basal temperature after heat stimuli was significant on dynamic thermal imaging. With histopathological correlations, it was possible to differentiate normal, premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions according to thermal imaging results. CD 31 staining analysis showed that increased vasculature was the key change responsible for different thermal imaging results among photocarcinogenesis steps. Conclusions: Dynamic thermal imaging is useful to differentiate normal, premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions. Increased vasculature is the key change responsible for different thermal imaging results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Hyperthermia
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017 Dec 6

Fingerprint

Hot Temperature
Skin
Staining and Labeling
Hairless Mouse
Cosmetics
Radiation
Biopsy
Control Groups
Temperature

Keywords

  • actinic keratosis
  • dynamic thermal imaging
  • hairless albino mouse
  • photocarcinogenesis
  • squamous cell carcinoma
  • Thermal imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Application of dynamic thermal imaging in a photocarcinogenesis mouse model. / Baek, Yoo Sang; Kim, Jaeyoung; Han, Geo; Oh, Chil Hwan.

In: International Journal of Hyperthermia, 06.12.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baek, Yoo Sang ; Kim, Jaeyoung ; Han, Geo ; Oh, Chil Hwan. / Application of dynamic thermal imaging in a photocarcinogenesis mouse model. In: International Journal of Hyperthermia. 2017 ; pp. 1-8.
@article{5ef20e7573904ee2a2d1f8f2904a44fd,
title = "Application of dynamic thermal imaging in a photocarcinogenesis mouse model",
abstract = "Introduction: In clinical practice and experimental settings, cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions are commonly diagnosed by histopathological biopsy. However, this technique is invasive and results in functional or cosmetic defects. Dynamic thermal imaging is a non-invasive technique that quantifies the infra-red (IR) radiation emitted by a subject after the introduction of external thermal stimuli (such as heat or cold). Methods: Forty hairless albino (Crl:SKH1-hr) mice were randomised to the control group or the experimental group. The experimental group was regularly irradiated with artificial ultraviolet. Clinical photographs, immunohistochemical staining and dynamic thermal imaging results of both groups were obtained. Results: As photocarcinogenesis proceeded, faster thermal recovery to basal temperature after heat stimuli was significant on dynamic thermal imaging. With histopathological correlations, it was possible to differentiate normal, premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions according to thermal imaging results. CD 31 staining analysis showed that increased vasculature was the key change responsible for different thermal imaging results among photocarcinogenesis steps. Conclusions: Dynamic thermal imaging is useful to differentiate normal, premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions. Increased vasculature is the key change responsible for different thermal imaging results.",
keywords = "actinic keratosis, dynamic thermal imaging, hairless albino mouse, photocarcinogenesis, squamous cell carcinoma, Thermal imaging",
author = "Baek, {Yoo Sang} and Jaeyoung Kim and Geo Han and Oh, {Chil Hwan}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1080/02656736.2017.1408858",
language = "English",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "International Journal of Hyperthermia",
issn = "0265-6736",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Application of dynamic thermal imaging in a photocarcinogenesis mouse model

AU - Baek, Yoo Sang

AU - Kim, Jaeyoung

AU - Han, Geo

AU - Oh, Chil Hwan

PY - 2017/12/6

Y1 - 2017/12/6

N2 - Introduction: In clinical practice and experimental settings, cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions are commonly diagnosed by histopathological biopsy. However, this technique is invasive and results in functional or cosmetic defects. Dynamic thermal imaging is a non-invasive technique that quantifies the infra-red (IR) radiation emitted by a subject after the introduction of external thermal stimuli (such as heat or cold). Methods: Forty hairless albino (Crl:SKH1-hr) mice were randomised to the control group or the experimental group. The experimental group was regularly irradiated with artificial ultraviolet. Clinical photographs, immunohistochemical staining and dynamic thermal imaging results of both groups were obtained. Results: As photocarcinogenesis proceeded, faster thermal recovery to basal temperature after heat stimuli was significant on dynamic thermal imaging. With histopathological correlations, it was possible to differentiate normal, premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions according to thermal imaging results. CD 31 staining analysis showed that increased vasculature was the key change responsible for different thermal imaging results among photocarcinogenesis steps. Conclusions: Dynamic thermal imaging is useful to differentiate normal, premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions. Increased vasculature is the key change responsible for different thermal imaging results.

AB - Introduction: In clinical practice and experimental settings, cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions are commonly diagnosed by histopathological biopsy. However, this technique is invasive and results in functional or cosmetic defects. Dynamic thermal imaging is a non-invasive technique that quantifies the infra-red (IR) radiation emitted by a subject after the introduction of external thermal stimuli (such as heat or cold). Methods: Forty hairless albino (Crl:SKH1-hr) mice were randomised to the control group or the experimental group. The experimental group was regularly irradiated with artificial ultraviolet. Clinical photographs, immunohistochemical staining and dynamic thermal imaging results of both groups were obtained. Results: As photocarcinogenesis proceeded, faster thermal recovery to basal temperature after heat stimuli was significant on dynamic thermal imaging. With histopathological correlations, it was possible to differentiate normal, premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions according to thermal imaging results. CD 31 staining analysis showed that increased vasculature was the key change responsible for different thermal imaging results among photocarcinogenesis steps. Conclusions: Dynamic thermal imaging is useful to differentiate normal, premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions. Increased vasculature is the key change responsible for different thermal imaging results.

KW - actinic keratosis

KW - dynamic thermal imaging

KW - hairless albino mouse

KW - photocarcinogenesis

KW - squamous cell carcinoma

KW - Thermal imaging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85037619404&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85037619404&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02656736.2017.1408858

DO - 10.1080/02656736.2017.1408858

M3 - Article

C2 - 29166797

AN - SCOPUS:85037619404

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - International Journal of Hyperthermia

JF - International Journal of Hyperthermia

SN - 0265-6736

ER -