Are we a product of our environment? Assessing culturally congruent Green advertising appeals, novelty, and environmental concern in India and the U.S.A.

Sidharth Muralidharan, Carrie La Ferle, Youngjun Sung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In response to rising consumption effects on the environment, green advertisers have employed different tactics to advertise their unique products. Limited research has explored the impact of culturally congruent appeals in green advertising. A total of 118 (N) adults participated online to assess the influence of these appeals in a cross-cultural context. Findings indicate that collectivistic appeals worked best among Indian consumers while individualistic appeals were more effective for Americans. Ad novelty and environmental concern were important covariates. Implications for advertisers are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)396-414
Number of pages19
JournalAsian Journal of Communication
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jul 4

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Marketing
appeal
India
tactics

Keywords

  • ad novelty
  • culture
  • environment
  • Green advertising
  • India
  • individualism-collectivism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Education

Cite this

Are we a product of our environment? Assessing culturally congruent Green advertising appeals, novelty, and environmental concern in India and the U.S.A. / Muralidharan, Sidharth; La Ferle, Carrie; Sung, Youngjun.

In: Asian Journal of Communication, Vol. 27, No. 4, 04.07.2017, p. 396-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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