Association between vitamin D intake and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis: A meta-analysis

Gwan Gyu Song, Sang Cheol Bae, Young Ho Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to summarize published results on the association between vitamin D intake and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and between serum vitamin D levels and RA activity. Evidence of a relationship between vitamin D intake and the development of RA and between serum vitamin D levels and RA activity was studied by summarizing published results using a meta-analysis approach. Three cohort studies including 215,757 participants and 874 incident cases of RA were considered in this meta-analysis, and eight studies on the association between serum vitamin D levels and RA activity involving 2,885 RA patients and 1,084 controls were included. Meta-analysis showed an association between total vitamin D intake and RA incidence (relative risk (RR) of the highest vs. the lowest group=0.758, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.577-0.937, p=0.047), without between-study heterogeneity (I2=0 %, p=0.595). Individuals in the highest group for total vitamin D intake were found to have a 24.2 % lower risk of developing RA than those in the lowest group. Subgroup meta-analysis also showed a significant association between vitamin D supplement intake and RA incidence (RR 0.764, 95 % CI 0.628-0.930, p=0.007), without between-study heterogeneity. All studies, except for one, found that vitamin D levels are inversely associated with RA activity. One study found no correlation between vitamin D levels and disease activity among 85 RA patients, but these patients had a high incidence of vitamin D deficiency, which might have influenced the study outcome. Meta-analysis of 215,757 participants suggests that low vitamin D intake is associated with an elevated risk of RA development. Furthermore, available evidence indicates that vitamin D level is associated with RA activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1733-1739
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Rheumatology
Volume31
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Dec 1

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Vitamin D
Meta-Analysis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Incidence
Serum
Confidence Intervals
Vitamin D Deficiency
Cohort Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Activity
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Susceptibility
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Association between vitamin D intake and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis : A meta-analysis. / Song, Gwan Gyu; Bae, Sang Cheol; Lee, Young Ho.

In: Clinical Rheumatology, Vol. 31, No. 12, 01.12.2012, p. 1733-1739.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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