Association of food consumption during pregnancy with mercury and lead levels in cord blood

Jin Hee Kim, Su Jin Lee, Su Young Kim, Gyuyeon Choi, Jeong Jae Lee, Hai Joong Kim, Sungjoo Kim, Jeongim Park, Hyo Bang Moon, Kyungho Choi, Sungkyoon Kim, Soo ran Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In utero exposure to mercury and lead has been linked to various adverse health effects related to growth and development. However, there was no evidence on the relationship between food consumption during pregnancy and mercury or lead level in cord blood. Therefore we measured mercury and lead levels in bloods, urines, and cord bloods obtained from 302 pregnant women and estimated relationships between food consumption during pregnancy and mercury or lead level in cord blood to identify perinatal mercury and lead exposures originated from foods during pregnancy. Relationship between food consumption and mercury or lead level was estimated using a generalized linear model after adjustment for body mass index (BMI), delivery experience, income, recruitment year, and other dietary factors for mercury and age, BMI, cesarean section, delivery experience, recruitment year, and other dietary factors for lead. Fish consumption was positively associated with mercury level in cord blood (p = 0.0135), while cereal and vegetable consumptions were positively associated with lead level in cord blood (p = 0.0517 for cereal and p = 0.0504 for vegetable). Furthermore, tea consumption restrained increase of lead level in cord blood (p = 0.0014). Our findings support that mercury or lead exposure in Korean pregnant women may come from frequent fish and cereal or vegetable consumption while tea consumption may decrease lead exposure in pregnant women. Therefore, careful intervention through food consumption should be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-124
Number of pages7
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume563-564
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 1

Fingerprint

food consumption
Mercury
pregnancy
Blood
Lead
Vegetables
cereal
vegetable
Fish
tea
body mass
blood
mercury
lead level in blood
fish
growth and development
urine
Health
consumption
income

Keywords

  • Food consumption
  • Mercury and lead exposures
  • Pregnant women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Association of food consumption during pregnancy with mercury and lead levels in cord blood. / Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Su Young; Choi, Gyuyeon; Lee, Jeong Jae; Kim, Hai Joong; Kim, Sungjoo; Park, Jeongim; Moon, Hyo Bang; Choi, Kyungho; Kim, Sungkyoon; Choi, Soo ran.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 563-564, 01.09.2016, p. 118-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, JH, Lee, SJ, Kim, SY, Choi, G, Lee, JJ, Kim, HJ, Kim, S, Park, J, Moon, HB, Choi, K, Kim, S & Choi, SR 2016, 'Association of food consumption during pregnancy with mercury and lead levels in cord blood', Science of the Total Environment, vol. 563-564, pp. 118-124. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.082
Kim, Jin Hee ; Lee, Su Jin ; Kim, Su Young ; Choi, Gyuyeon ; Lee, Jeong Jae ; Kim, Hai Joong ; Kim, Sungjoo ; Park, Jeongim ; Moon, Hyo Bang ; Choi, Kyungho ; Kim, Sungkyoon ; Choi, Soo ran. / Association of food consumption during pregnancy with mercury and lead levels in cord blood. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2016 ; Vol. 563-564. pp. 118-124.
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