Associations Between Alcohol Consumption and Leukocyte Telomere Length Modified by a Common Polymorphism of ALDH2

Chol Shin, Inkyung Baik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Data on the association between alcohol consumption and telomere length, a marker of biological aging, are inconsistent. Moreover, the genetic modification of this association has been reported only rarely. To evaluate the association between alcohol consumption and leukocyte telomere length (LTL), and the effect modification of this association by a common polymorphism of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene, we conducted a cross-sectional study in a general population including 1,771 middle-aged and elderly Koreans, aged 49 to 79 years. Methods: Study participants provided blood samples between 2011 and 2012 for the LTL assay, and between 2001 and 2002 for genomewide genotyping. Between 2011 and 2012, they also completed a questionnaire-based interview regarding their alcohol consumption. We examined effect modification by rs2074356, a surrogate marker of the ALDH2 polymorphism. Results: Heavy alcohol consumption (average daily alcohol consumption of >30 g) was inversely associated with LTL only among carriers of the mutant alleles (CT and TT) of rs2074356 (p <0.01). Among these subjects, elderly drinkers in particular showed the strongest association (p <0.001). Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption on an almost daily basis was positively associated with LTL (p <0.001), and this association was significant among carriers of the wild-type allele (CC) of rs2074356 (p <0.01) but not among those with the mutant alleles. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the potential benefit of light-to-moderate alcohol consumption and the detriment of heavy alcohol consumption on biological aging may depend on ALDH2 polymorphism.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Aldehyde Dehydrogenase
Telomere
Polymorphism
Alcohol Drinking
Leukocytes
Alcohols
Association reactions
Alleles
Aging of materials
Assays
Blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Genes
Biomarkers
Interviews

Keywords

  • Alcohol Consumption
  • ALDH2 Polymorphism
  • Telomere Length

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology

Cite this

@article{b9d9e40db4dc43cf9f91778e29e43595,
title = "Associations Between Alcohol Consumption and Leukocyte Telomere Length Modified by a Common Polymorphism of ALDH2",
abstract = "Background: Data on the association between alcohol consumption and telomere length, a marker of biological aging, are inconsistent. Moreover, the genetic modification of this association has been reported only rarely. To evaluate the association between alcohol consumption and leukocyte telomere length (LTL), and the effect modification of this association by a common polymorphism of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene, we conducted a cross-sectional study in a general population including 1,771 middle-aged and elderly Koreans, aged 49 to 79 years. Methods: Study participants provided blood samples between 2011 and 2012 for the LTL assay, and between 2001 and 2002 for genomewide genotyping. Between 2011 and 2012, they also completed a questionnaire-based interview regarding their alcohol consumption. We examined effect modification by rs2074356, a surrogate marker of the ALDH2 polymorphism. Results: Heavy alcohol consumption (average daily alcohol consumption of >30 g) was inversely associated with LTL only among carriers of the mutant alleles (CT and TT) of rs2074356 (p <0.01). Among these subjects, elderly drinkers in particular showed the strongest association (p <0.001). Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption on an almost daily basis was positively associated with LTL (p <0.001), and this association was significant among carriers of the wild-type allele (CC) of rs2074356 (p <0.01) but not among those with the mutant alleles. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the potential benefit of light-to-moderate alcohol consumption and the detriment of heavy alcohol consumption on biological aging may depend on ALDH2 polymorphism.",
keywords = "Alcohol Consumption, ALDH2 Polymorphism, Telomere Length",
author = "Chol Shin and Inkyung Baik",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1111/acer.13005",
language = "English",
journal = "Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research",
issn = "0145-6008",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations Between Alcohol Consumption and Leukocyte Telomere Length Modified by a Common Polymorphism of ALDH2

AU - Shin, Chol

AU - Baik, Inkyung

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Data on the association between alcohol consumption and telomere length, a marker of biological aging, are inconsistent. Moreover, the genetic modification of this association has been reported only rarely. To evaluate the association between alcohol consumption and leukocyte telomere length (LTL), and the effect modification of this association by a common polymorphism of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene, we conducted a cross-sectional study in a general population including 1,771 middle-aged and elderly Koreans, aged 49 to 79 years. Methods: Study participants provided blood samples between 2011 and 2012 for the LTL assay, and between 2001 and 2002 for genomewide genotyping. Between 2011 and 2012, they also completed a questionnaire-based interview regarding their alcohol consumption. We examined effect modification by rs2074356, a surrogate marker of the ALDH2 polymorphism. Results: Heavy alcohol consumption (average daily alcohol consumption of >30 g) was inversely associated with LTL only among carriers of the mutant alleles (CT and TT) of rs2074356 (p <0.01). Among these subjects, elderly drinkers in particular showed the strongest association (p <0.001). Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption on an almost daily basis was positively associated with LTL (p <0.001), and this association was significant among carriers of the wild-type allele (CC) of rs2074356 (p <0.01) but not among those with the mutant alleles. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the potential benefit of light-to-moderate alcohol consumption and the detriment of heavy alcohol consumption on biological aging may depend on ALDH2 polymorphism.

AB - Background: Data on the association between alcohol consumption and telomere length, a marker of biological aging, are inconsistent. Moreover, the genetic modification of this association has been reported only rarely. To evaluate the association between alcohol consumption and leukocyte telomere length (LTL), and the effect modification of this association by a common polymorphism of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene, we conducted a cross-sectional study in a general population including 1,771 middle-aged and elderly Koreans, aged 49 to 79 years. Methods: Study participants provided blood samples between 2011 and 2012 for the LTL assay, and between 2001 and 2002 for genomewide genotyping. Between 2011 and 2012, they also completed a questionnaire-based interview regarding their alcohol consumption. We examined effect modification by rs2074356, a surrogate marker of the ALDH2 polymorphism. Results: Heavy alcohol consumption (average daily alcohol consumption of >30 g) was inversely associated with LTL only among carriers of the mutant alleles (CT and TT) of rs2074356 (p <0.01). Among these subjects, elderly drinkers in particular showed the strongest association (p <0.001). Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption on an almost daily basis was positively associated with LTL (p <0.001), and this association was significant among carriers of the wild-type allele (CC) of rs2074356 (p <0.01) but not among those with the mutant alleles. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the potential benefit of light-to-moderate alcohol consumption and the detriment of heavy alcohol consumption on biological aging may depend on ALDH2 polymorphism.

KW - Alcohol Consumption

KW - ALDH2 Polymorphism

KW - Telomere Length

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