Asthma control test reflects not only lung function but also airway inflammation in children with stable asthma

Woo Yeon Lee, Dong In Suh, Dae Jin Song, Hey Sung Baek, Meeyong Shin, Young Yoo, Ji Won Kwon, Gwang Cheon Jang, Hyeon Jong Yang, Eun Lee, Ju Hee Seo, Sung Il Woo, Hyung Young Kim, Youn Ho Shin, Ju Suk Lee, Jisun Yoon, Sungsu Jung, Minkyu Han, Eunjin Eom, Jinho YuWoo Kyung Kim, Dae Hyun Lim, Jin Tack Kim, Woo Sung Chang, Jeom Kyu Lee, Hwan Soo Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Various numerical asthma control tools have been developed to distinguish different levels of symptom control. We aimed to examine whether the asthma control test (ACT) is reflective of objective findings such as lung function, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and laboratory data in patients with stable asthma. Methods: We included patients who were enrolled in the Korean Childhood Asthma Study. ACT, spirometry, blood tests and FeNO were performed in patients after stabilization of their asthma. We examined differences among spirometry parameters, blood tests and FeNO according to control status as determined by ACT and investigated for any significant correlations. Results: The study population consisted of 441 subjects. Spirometry showed that forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity and FEV1/forced vital capacity were all significantly higher in the controlled asthma group. Likewise, FeNO and percent-change in FEV1 were both significantly lower in the controlled asthma group. In blood tests, the eosinophil fraction was significantly lower in the controlled asthma group while white blood cell count was significantly higher in the controlled asthma group. Lastly, among the various factors analyzed, only provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 significantly correlated with ACT score. Conclusion: ACT is useful as part of the routine evaluation of asthmatic children and should be used as a complement to existing tools such as spirometry and FeNO measurement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)648-653
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jun 2

Keywords

  • Asthma control test
  • bronchial hyperreactivity
  • bronchodilator response
  • children
  • fractional exhaled nitric oxide
  • spirometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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  • Cite this

    Lee, W. Y., Suh, D. I., Song, D. J., Baek, H. S., Shin, M., Yoo, Y., Kwon, J. W., Jang, G. C., Yang, H. J., Lee, E., Seo, J. H., Woo, S. I., Kim, H. Y., Shin, Y. H., Lee, J. S., Yoon, J., Jung, S., Han, M., Eom, E., ... Kim, H. S. (2020). Asthma control test reflects not only lung function but also airway inflammation in children with stable asthma. Journal of Asthma, 57(6), 648-653. https://doi.org/10.1080/02770903.2019.1599386