Athroscopic transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with preservation of posterior cruciate ligament fibers: Clinical results of minimum 2-year follow-up

Jin Hwan Ahn, Hyoung Seop Yang, Woong-Kyo Jeong, Kyoung Hwah Koh

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72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The transtibial technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstructions can potentially lead to poor clinical outcomes due to the "killer turn" effect. Hypothesis: Preserving the original posterior cruciate ligament fibers in the reconstruction will contribute significantly to the posterior stability of the knee joint, healing of the graft, and prevention of graft failure. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Sixty-one patients (45 men and 16 women; mean age, 30.4 years) underwent transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with preservation of the cruciate ligament fibers; they were reviewed at a mean period of 40.8 months. All patients were assessed with the Lysholm knee score, International Knee Documentation Committee subjective and objective evaluations, and KT-2000 arthrometry. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 40 patients; images were assessed for graft continuity, thickness, and signal intensity. Second-look arthroscopy was performed in 42 patients. Results: The mean Lysholm score improved from 65.8 to 92.9. The final International Knee Documentation Committee subjective evaluation rated all patients as normal or nearly normal, and the objective evaluation showed normal or nearly normal in 59 patients (97%) and abnormal in 2 patients (3%). The mean side-to-side difference on the KT-2000 arthrometer was 2.79 mm. All patients showed well-preserved graft continuity on magnetic resonance images. Mean graft thickness was 9.9 mm in the sagittal plane and 12.3 mm in the coronal oblique plane. Images for all patients revealed homogeneously low signal intensity in the distal portion of the graft, with complete healing of the graft and original posterior cruciate ligament fibers as one ligament. Graft loosening or graft tear by the killer turn effect was not detected in any patients. Second-look arthroscopy revealed complete healing and graft integration, with the original posterior cruciate ligament fibers in all patients. Conclusion: In transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, poor outcomes from the killer turn effect may be reduced by preserving the original posterior cruciate ligament fibers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-204
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Feb 1
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • "Killer turn" effect
  • Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction
  • Preservation of PCL fibers
  • Second-look arthroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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