Bacillus subtilis strain L1 promotes nitrate reductase activity in Arabidopsis and elicits enhanced growth performance in Arabidopsis, lettuce, and wheat

Seokjin Lee, Cao Sơn Trịnh, Won Je Lee, Chan Young Jeong, Hai An Truong, Namhyun Chung, Chon Sik Kang, Hojoung Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a group of bacteria that promote plants growth in the rhizosphere. PGPRs are involved in various mechanisms that reinforce plant development. In this study, we screened for PGPRs that were effective in early growth of Arabidopsis thaliana when added to the media and one Bacillus subtilis strain L1 (Bs L1) was selected for further study. When Bs L1 was placed near the roots, seedlings showed notably stronger growth than that in the control, particularly in biomass and root hair. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed a high level of expression of the high affinity nitrate transporter gene, NRT2.1 in A. thaliana treated with Bs L1. After considering how Bs L1 could promote plant growth, we focused on nitrate, which is essential to plant growth. The nitrate content was lower in A. thaliana treated with Bs L1. However, examination of the activity of nitrate reductase revealed higher activity in plants treated with PGPR than in the control. Bs L1 had pronounced effects in representative crops (wheat and lettuce). These results suggest that Bs L1 promotes the assimilation and use of nitrate and plant growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-244
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Plant Research
Volume133
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Mar 1

Keywords

  • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Bacillus subtilis strain L1 (Bs L1)
  • NRT2
  • Nitrate reductase
  • PGPR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

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