Biglycan reduces body weight by regulating food intake in mice and improves glucose metabolism through AMPK/AKT dual pathways in skeletal muscle

In Hyeok Chung, Shin Ae Kim, Seolsong Kim, Jung Ok Lee, Clara Yongjoo Park, Juhee Lee, Jun Kang, Jin Young Lee, Ilhyeok Seo, Hye Jeong Lee, Jeong Ah Han, Min Ju Kang, Eunice Lim, Su Jin Kim, Sang Woo Wu, Joo Yeon Oh, Ji Hyung Chung, Eun Kyoung Kim, Hyeon Soo Kim, Min Jeong Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While biglycan (BGN) is suggested to direct diverse signaling cascades, the effects of soluble BGN as a ligand on metabolic traits have not been studied. Herein, we tested the effects of BGN on obesity in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese animals and glucose metabolism, with the underlying mechanism responsible for observed effects in vitro. Our results showed that BGN administration (1 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) significantly prevented HFD-induced obesity, and this was mainly attributed to reduced food intake. Also, intracerebroventricular injection of BGN reduced food intake and body weight. The underlying mechanism includes modulation of neuropeptides gene expression involved in appetite in the hypothalamus in vitro and in vivo. In addition, BGN regulates glucose metabolism as shown by improved glucose tolerance in mice as well as AMPK/AKT dual pathway-driven enhanced glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation in L6 myoblast cells. In conclusion, our results suggest BGN as a potential therapeutic target to treat risk factors for metabolic diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere21794
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume35
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Aug

Keywords

  • AKT
  • AMPK
  • biglycan
  • food intake
  • glucose uptake
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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