Biochemical properties of pelagic fish proteins as affected by isolation methods and gel properties by heating methods

Joo D. Park, Samanan Poowakanjana, Jae W. Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The biochemical and gel properties of Pacific sardine and Pacific mackerel were characterized as affected by preparation and cooking methods. Four to eight times more salt soluble proteins were extracted from water-washed paste than fish protein isolate (FPI) paste. Higher total sulfhydryl content was measured in FPI, indicating the exposure of sulfhydryl groups during alkaline extraction. Comparing gel properties based on two cooking methods (slow and fast), the two pelagic fish proteins performed quite differently. Heating rate did not differentiate between surimi and FPI gels from sardine. However, mackerel exhibited higher texture values when using the fast cooking method, indicating the presence of high levels of proteolytic enzymes. Water-washed surimi gels were whiter than FPI for both species. Water retention ability appeared to be higher with mackerel than sardine, regardless of isolation and cooking method. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel eletrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) also supported a difference in processing chemistry and thermal behavior between two methods for protein isolation and cooking, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-320
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Aquatic Food Product Technology
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fish Proteins
pelagic fish
isolation techniques
Cooking
Heating
protein isolates
cooking
Perciformes
gel
Gels
gels
heat treatment
heating
mackerel
protein
surimi
sardines
Ointments
proteins
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Biochemical properties of pelagic fish proteins as affected by isolation methods and gel properties by heating methods. / Park, Joo D.; Poowakanjana, Samanan; Park, Jae W.

In: Journal of Aquatic Food Product Technology, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.07.2012, p. 307-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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