Blood lead concentration and related factors in Korea from the 2008 National Survey for Environmental Pollutants in the Human Body

Seong Wook Jeong, Chae Kwan Lee, Chun Hui Suh, Kun Hyung Kim, Byung Chul Son, Jeong Ho Kim, Jong-Tae Lee, Soo Woong Lee, Yeong Beom Park, Jong Wha Lee, Seung Do Yu, Chan Seok Moon, Dae Hwan Kim, Sang Yoon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This study evaluated blood lead concentrations in the Korean general population and the correlation between various exposure sources using data from the 2008 Korea National Survey for Environmental Pollutants in the Human Body (National Institute of Environmental Research, Korea) The general and occupational characteristics were gathered from 5136 participants who were 20 years of age and older using a structured questionnaire Blood lead concentrations were analyzed using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer Statistical analysis was performed using multiple linear regressions of the log lead concentrations to the independent variables such as age, gender, smoke, herbal medication and drug consumption, drinking water, and living area Geometric mean (GM) blood lead concentrations in Korean adults were 19.7 μg/l The blood lead concentrations increased with age; the highest concentrations were found in the 50-69-year age group ( p< 0.001) Males were higher than in females ( p< 0.001) Current smokers and drinkers had higher concentrations than nonsmokers ( p< 0.001) and nondrinkers ( p< 0.001), respectively People who took herbal medication and drug consumption were higher than those who did not ( p< 0.001) Education level was negatively associated with blood lead concentration ( p< 0.001) People living in or around industrial areas had elevated blood lead concentration ( p< 0.001) Family income was also negatively associated with lead concentration, but not significantly For drinking water, the underground water (spring or well water) drinking group had higher concentrations than other types of water drinking groups, but not significantly ( p= 0.063) The blood lead concentrations by occupation were significant ( p< 0.034): the highest was in laborer and Agricultural-Fishery-Forestry and the lowest in office workers In women, blood lead concentrations tended to decrease with increasing delivery times, but not significantly The blood lead concentration (GM) of the general adult population in Korea has decreased over time from 45.8 μg/l (1999) to 19.7 μg/l (2008) Although it is still higher than in other countries such as the United States and Canada, it is rapidly decreasing Gender, age, smoking and alcohol drinking status, herbal medication and drug consumption, education level, living area and occupation were significantly related to the blood lead concentrations in Korea

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)871-877
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health
Volume217
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

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Environmental Pollutants
Korea
Human Body
Drinking Water
Occupations
Surveys and Questionnaires
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Education
Forestry
Fisheries
Information Storage and Retrieval
Groundwater
Lead
Smoke
Alcohol Drinking
Population
Canada
Linear Models
Age Groups
Smoking

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Blood lead concentration and related factors in Korea from the 2008 National Survey for Environmental Pollutants in the Human Body. / Jeong, Seong Wook; Lee, Chae Kwan; Suh, Chun Hui; Kim, Kun Hyung; Son, Byung Chul; Kim, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jong-Tae; Lee, Soo Woong; Park, Yeong Beom; Lee, Jong Wha; Yu, Seung Do; Moon, Chan Seok; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Sang Yoon.

In: International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, Vol. 217, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 871-877.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jeong, SW, Lee, CK, Suh, CH, Kim, KH, Son, BC, Kim, JH, Lee, J-T, Lee, SW, Park, YB, Lee, JW, Yu, SD, Moon, CS, Kim, DH & Lee, SY 2014, 'Blood lead concentration and related factors in Korea from the 2008 National Survey for Environmental Pollutants in the Human Body', International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, vol. 217, no. 8, pp. 871-877. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2014.06.006
Jeong, Seong Wook ; Lee, Chae Kwan ; Suh, Chun Hui ; Kim, Kun Hyung ; Son, Byung Chul ; Kim, Jeong Ho ; Lee, Jong-Tae ; Lee, Soo Woong ; Park, Yeong Beom ; Lee, Jong Wha ; Yu, Seung Do ; Moon, Chan Seok ; Kim, Dae Hwan ; Lee, Sang Yoon. / Blood lead concentration and related factors in Korea from the 2008 National Survey for Environmental Pollutants in the Human Body. In: International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health. 2014 ; Vol. 217, No. 8. pp. 871-877.
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N2 - This study evaluated blood lead concentrations in the Korean general population and the correlation between various exposure sources using data from the 2008 Korea National Survey for Environmental Pollutants in the Human Body (National Institute of Environmental Research, Korea) The general and occupational characteristics were gathered from 5136 participants who were 20 years of age and older using a structured questionnaire Blood lead concentrations were analyzed using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer Statistical analysis was performed using multiple linear regressions of the log lead concentrations to the independent variables such as age, gender, smoke, herbal medication and drug consumption, drinking water, and living area Geometric mean (GM) blood lead concentrations in Korean adults were 19.7 μg/l The blood lead concentrations increased with age; the highest concentrations were found in the 50-69-year age group ( p< 0.001) Males were higher than in females ( p< 0.001) Current smokers and drinkers had higher concentrations than nonsmokers ( p< 0.001) and nondrinkers ( p< 0.001), respectively People who took herbal medication and drug consumption were higher than those who did not ( p< 0.001) Education level was negatively associated with blood lead concentration ( p< 0.001) People living in or around industrial areas had elevated blood lead concentration ( p< 0.001) Family income was also negatively associated with lead concentration, but not significantly For drinking water, the underground water (spring or well water) drinking group had higher concentrations than other types of water drinking groups, but not significantly ( p= 0.063) The blood lead concentrations by occupation were significant ( p< 0.034): the highest was in laborer and Agricultural-Fishery-Forestry and the lowest in office workers In women, blood lead concentrations tended to decrease with increasing delivery times, but not significantly The blood lead concentration (GM) of the general adult population in Korea has decreased over time from 45.8 μg/l (1999) to 19.7 μg/l (2008) Although it is still higher than in other countries such as the United States and Canada, it is rapidly decreasing Gender, age, smoking and alcohol drinking status, herbal medication and drug consumption, education level, living area and occupation were significantly related to the blood lead concentrations in Korea

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