Butyric acid production from red algae by a newly isolated Clostridium sp. S1

Kyung Min Lee, Okkyoung Choi, Ki Yeon Kim, Han Min Woo, Yunje Kim, Sung Ok Han, Byoung In Sang, Youngsoon Um

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To produce butyric acid from red algae such as Gelidium amansii in which galactose is a main carbohydrate, microorganisms utilizing galactose and tolerating inhibitors in hydrolysis including levulinic acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are required. Results: A newly isolated bacterium, Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid not only from galactose as the sole carbon source but also from a mixture of galactose and glucose through simultaneous utilization. Notably, Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid and a small amount of acetic acid with the butyrate:acetate ratio of 45.4:1 and it even converted acetate to butyric acid. Clostridium sp. S1 tolerated 0.5–2 g levulinic acid/l and recovered from HMF inhibition at 0.6–2.5 g/l, resulting in 85–92 % butyric acid concentration of the control culture. When acid-pretreated G. amansii hydrolysate was used, Clostridium sp. S1 produced 4.83 g butyric acid/l from 10 g galactose/l and 1 g glucose/l. Conclusion: Clostridium sp. S1 produces butyric acid from red algae due to its characteristics in sugar utilization and tolerance to inhibitors, demonstrating its advantage as a red algae-utilizing microorganism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1837-1844
Number of pages8
JournalBiotechnology Letters
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 May 31

Fingerprint

Rhodophyta
Butyric Acid
Clostridium
Galactose
Acetates
Glucose
Butyrates
Acetic Acid
Hydrolysis
Carbon
Carbohydrates
Bacteria
Acids

Keywords

  • Biofuel
  • Butyric acid fermentation
  • Clostridium
  • Galactose
  • Gelidium amansii
  • Red algae hydrolysate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Butyric acid production from red algae by a newly isolated Clostridium sp. S1. / Lee, Kyung Min; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Ki Yeon; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Yunje; Han, Sung Ok; Sang, Byoung In; Um, Youngsoon.

In: Biotechnology Letters, Vol. 37, No. 9, 31.05.2015, p. 1837-1844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, KM, Choi, O, Kim, KY, Woo, HM, Kim, Y, Han, SO, Sang, BI & Um, Y 2015, 'Butyric acid production from red algae by a newly isolated Clostridium sp. S1', Biotechnology Letters, vol. 37, no. 9, pp. 1837-1844. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10529-015-1869-2
Lee, Kyung Min ; Choi, Okkyoung ; Kim, Ki Yeon ; Woo, Han Min ; Kim, Yunje ; Han, Sung Ok ; Sang, Byoung In ; Um, Youngsoon. / Butyric acid production from red algae by a newly isolated Clostridium sp. S1. In: Biotechnology Letters. 2015 ; Vol. 37, No. 9. pp. 1837-1844.
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AB - Objective: To produce butyric acid from red algae such as Gelidium amansii in which galactose is a main carbohydrate, microorganisms utilizing galactose and tolerating inhibitors in hydrolysis including levulinic acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are required. Results: A newly isolated bacterium, Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid not only from galactose as the sole carbon source but also from a mixture of galactose and glucose through simultaneous utilization. Notably, Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid and a small amount of acetic acid with the butyrate:acetate ratio of 45.4:1 and it even converted acetate to butyric acid. Clostridium sp. S1 tolerated 0.5–2 g levulinic acid/l and recovered from HMF inhibition at 0.6–2.5 g/l, resulting in 85–92 % butyric acid concentration of the control culture. When acid-pretreated G. amansii hydrolysate was used, Clostridium sp. S1 produced 4.83 g butyric acid/l from 10 g galactose/l and 1 g glucose/l. Conclusion: Clostridium sp. S1 produces butyric acid from red algae due to its characteristics in sugar utilization and tolerance to inhibitors, demonstrating its advantage as a red algae-utilizing microorganism.

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