Cancelling biodynamic feedthrough requires a subject and task dependent approach

Joost Venrooij, Mark Mulder, Marinus M. Van Paassen, David A. Abbink, Heinrich Bulthoff, Max Mulder

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vehicle accelerations may feed through the human body, causing involuntary limb motions which may lead to involuntary control inputs. This phenomenon is called biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT). Signal cancellation is a possible way of mitigating biodynamic feedthrough. It makes use of a BDFT model to estimate the involuntary control inputs. The BDFT effects are removed by subtracting the modeled estimate of the involuntary control input from the total control signal, containing both voluntary and involuntary components. The success of signal cancellation hinges on the accuracy of the BDFT model used. In this study the potential of signal cancellation is studied by making use of a method called optimal signal cancellation. Here, an identified BDFT model is used off-line to generate an estimate of the involuntary control inputs based on the accelerations present. Results show that reliable signal cancellation requires BDFT models that are both subject and task dependent. The task dependency is of particular importance: failing to adapt the model to changes in the operator's neuromuscular dynamics dramatically decreases the quality of cancellation and can even lead to an increase in unwanted effects. As a reliable and fast on-line identification method of the neuromuscular dynamics of the human operator currently does not exist, real-time signal cancellation is currently not feasible.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationConference Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics
Pages1670-1675
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec 23
Event2011 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, SMC 2011 - Anchorage, AK, United States
Duration: 2011 Oct 92011 Oct 12

Other

Other2011 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, SMC 2011
CountryUnited States
CityAnchorage, AK
Period11/10/911/10/12

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Keywords

  • Biodynamic feedthrough
  • model-based cancellation
  • signal cancellation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Venrooij, J., Mulder, M., Van Paassen, M. M., Abbink, D. A., Bulthoff, H., & Mulder, M. (2011). Cancelling biodynamic feedthrough requires a subject and task dependent approach. In Conference Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics (pp. 1670-1675). [6083911] https://doi.org/10.1109/ICSMC.2011.6083911

Cancelling biodynamic feedthrough requires a subject and task dependent approach. / Venrooij, Joost; Mulder, Mark; Van Paassen, Marinus M.; Abbink, David A.; Bulthoff, Heinrich; Mulder, Max.

Conference Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. 2011. p. 1670-1675 6083911.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Venrooij, J, Mulder, M, Van Paassen, MM, Abbink, DA, Bulthoff, H & Mulder, M 2011, Cancelling biodynamic feedthrough requires a subject and task dependent approach. in Conference Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics., 6083911, pp. 1670-1675, 2011 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, SMC 2011, Anchorage, AK, United States, 11/10/9. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICSMC.2011.6083911
Venrooij J, Mulder M, Van Paassen MM, Abbink DA, Bulthoff H, Mulder M. Cancelling biodynamic feedthrough requires a subject and task dependent approach. In Conference Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. 2011. p. 1670-1675. 6083911 https://doi.org/10.1109/ICSMC.2011.6083911
Venrooij, Joost ; Mulder, Mark ; Van Paassen, Marinus M. ; Abbink, David A. ; Bulthoff, Heinrich ; Mulder, Max. / Cancelling biodynamic feedthrough requires a subject and task dependent approach. Conference Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. 2011. pp. 1670-1675
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