Cell adhesion on phase-separated surface of block copolymer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) and poly(dimethylsiloxane)

Ji-Hun Seo, Ryosuke Matsuno, Madoka Takai, Kazuhiko Ishihara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the morphological effect of phase-separated block copolymer surfaces composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)) (PMPC) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) on protein adsorption and cell adhesion behavior. We observed three different types of phase-separated surface morphologies by TEM and AFM. The elemental composition of phosphorus on the surface increases with the PMPC composition. Furthermore, the polymer surface formed by a block copolymer-containing a higher MPC unit composition shows a slightly lower static water contact angle. This result indicates that the elemental surface ratio of the surface depends on the MPC composition in the block copolymer. Protein adsorption tests revealed that only hydrophobic PDMS domains showed selective protein adsorption. Cell adhesion tests revealed that the number of adhered cells increased with increasing hydrophobic PDMS domain size of block copolymers in serum-containing media. In contrast, no cells adhered onto block copolymer surfaces in serum-free media, whereas a large amount of adhered cells were observed on the hydrophobic PDMS surface. This result indicates that segregated hydrophobic domains on a biocompatible PMPC surface strongly affect serum protein adsorption, thereby promoting considerable cell adhesion, although the surface is hydrophilic. Thus, both the composition of MPC units and the segregated hydrophobic surface morphology are important considerations in biomaterial surface design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5330-5340
Number of pages11
JournalBiomaterials
Volume30
Issue number29
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Oct 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cell adhesion
Polydimethylsiloxane
Cell Adhesion
Adsorption
Block copolymers
Proteins
Serum-Free Culture Media
Biocompatible Materials
Chemical analysis
Phosphorus
Blood Proteins
Polymers
Cell Count
Surface morphology
baysilon
poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl-phosphorylcholine)
Water
Serum
2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine
Biomaterials

Keywords

  • Block copolymer
  • Cell adhesion
  • Phosphorylcholine
  • Polydimethylsiloxane
  • Protein adsorption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Cell adhesion on phase-separated surface of block copolymer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) and poly(dimethylsiloxane). / Seo, Ji-Hun; Matsuno, Ryosuke; Takai, Madoka; Ishihara, Kazuhiko.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 30, No. 29, 01.10.2009, p. 5330-5340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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