Cell damage during femtosecond optical trapping

Kang B. Im, Sumin Han, Hwajoon Park, Dan Jin, Soo K. Kim, Beop-Min Kim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microparticles including biological cells were trapped and manipulated using a continuous wave tweezer and a femtosecond laser tweezer. The difference of the optical trapping force between CW and femtosecond optical tweezers increased as the particle size decreased, possibly due to the self-focusing effect of the ultrashort pulses. Also, the white damage spots were generated near the focus during femtosecond optical trapping of biological cells even with extremely low average power. The instantaneous optical damage threshold was measured as a function of the trap depth as well. These results may help to optimize the optical trapping of biological cells using femtosecond lasers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
EditorsD.V. Nicolau, J. Enderlein, R.C. Leif, D.L. Farkas, R. Raghavachari
Pages274-280
Number of pages7
Volume5699
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
EventImaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules and Cells: Fundamentals and Applications III - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: 2005 Jan 242005 Jan 27

Other

OtherImaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules and Cells: Fundamentals and Applications III
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period05/1/2405/1/27

Fingerprint

Ultrashort pulses
Cells
Optical tweezers
Particle size

Keywords

  • Femtosecond lasers
  • Laser damage
  • Optical trapping
  • Tweezers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Im, K. B., Han, S., Park, H., Jin, D., Kim, S. K., & Kim, B-M. (2005). Cell damage during femtosecond optical trapping. In D. V. Nicolau, J. Enderlein, R. C. Leif, D. L. Farkas, & R. Raghavachari (Eds.), Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 5699, pp. 274-280). [40] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.591446

Cell damage during femtosecond optical trapping. / Im, Kang B.; Han, Sumin; Park, Hwajoon; Jin, Dan; Kim, Soo K.; Kim, Beop-Min.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. ed. / D.V. Nicolau; J. Enderlein; R.C. Leif; D.L. Farkas; R. Raghavachari. Vol. 5699 2005. p. 274-280 40.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Im, KB, Han, S, Park, H, Jin, D, Kim, SK & Kim, B-M 2005, Cell damage during femtosecond optical trapping. in DV Nicolau, J Enderlein, RC Leif, DL Farkas & R Raghavachari (eds), Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 5699, 40, pp. 274-280, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules and Cells: Fundamentals and Applications III, San Jose, CA, United States, 05/1/24. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.591446
Im KB, Han S, Park H, Jin D, Kim SK, Kim B-M. Cell damage during femtosecond optical trapping. In Nicolau DV, Enderlein J, Leif RC, Farkas DL, Raghavachari R, editors, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 5699. 2005. p. 274-280. 40 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.591446
Im, Kang B. ; Han, Sumin ; Park, Hwajoon ; Jin, Dan ; Kim, Soo K. ; Kim, Beop-Min. / Cell damage during femtosecond optical trapping. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. editor / D.V. Nicolau ; J. Enderlein ; R.C. Leif ; D.L. Farkas ; R. Raghavachari. Vol. 5699 2005. pp. 274-280
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