Cerebral amyloid accumulation is associated with distinct structural and functional alterations in the brain of depressed elders with mild cognitive impairment

Won Seok William Hyung, June Kang, Junhyung Kim, Suji Lee, Hyun Chul Youn, Byung Joo Ham, Changsu Han, Sangil Suh, Cheol E. Han, Hyun Ghang Jeong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Elderly patients with late-life depression (LLD) often report mild cognitive impairment (MCI), so Alzheimer's disease (AD) is hard to identify in these patients. We aimed to identify the structural and functional differences between prodromal AD and LLD-related MCI. Methods: We performed voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity (FC) analyses in elderly patients with both LLD and MCI to compare alterations between those with cerebral amyloidopathy and those without. We subdivided patients into subthreshold depression (STD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) groups. Using florbetaben positron emission tomography (PET), we compared volume and connectivity between healthy controls and four STD and MDD groups with or without amyloid deposition(A): STD-MCI-A(+), MDD-MCI-A(+), STD-MCI-A(-), and MDD-MCI-A(-). Results: Subjects with MDD or amyloid deposition showed greater volume reduction in the left middle temporal gyrus. MDD groups had lower FC than STD groups in the frontal, cortical, and limbic areas. The STD-MCI-A(+) group showed greater FC reduction than the MDD-MCI-A(-) and STD-MCI-A(-) groups, particularly in the hippocampus, parahippocampus, and frontal and temporal cortices. The functional differences associated with amyloid plaques were more evident in the STD group than in the MDD group. Limitations: Limitations include disproportional sex ratios, inability to determine the longitudinal effects of amyloidopathy in large populations. Conclusions: Regional gray matter loss and alterations in brain networks may reflect impairments caused by amyloid deposition and depression. Such changes may facilitate the detection of prodromal AD in elderly patients with both depression and cognitive dysfunction, allowing earlier intervention and more appropriate treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-466
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume281
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Feb 15

Keywords

  • Amyloid accumulation
  • Late-life depression
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Resting-state functional connectivity
  • Voxel-based morphometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cerebral amyloid accumulation is associated with distinct structural and functional alterations in the brain of depressed elders with mild cognitive impairment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this