Chapter 18 Processing of facial identity and expression: a psychophysical, physiological, and computational perspective

Adrian Schwaninger, Christian Wallraven, Douglas W. Cunningham, Sarah D. Chiller-Glaus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A deeper understanding of how the brain processes visual information can be obtained by comparing results from complementary fields such as psychophysics, physiology, and computer science. In this chapter, empirical findings are reviewed with regard to the proposed mechanisms and representations for processing identity and emotion in faces. Results from psychophysics clearly show that faces are processed by analyzing component information (eyes, nose, mouth, etc.) and their spatial relationship (configural information). Results from neuroscience indicate separate neural systems for recognition of identity and facial expression. Computer science offers a deeper understanding of the required algorithms and representations, and provides computational modeling of psychological and physiological accounts. An interdisciplinary approach taking these different perspectives into account provides a promising basis for better understanding and modeling of how the human brain processes visual information for recognition of identity and emotion in faces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-343
Number of pages23
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume156
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • component and configural processing
  • computational modeling of face processing
  • face processing modules
  • face recognition
  • facial expression
  • interdisciplinary approach
  • psychophysics of face processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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