Chemical stabilization of Cd-contaminated soil using biochar

R. Van Poucke, J. Ainsworth, M. Maeseele, Yong Sik Ok, E. Meers, F. M.G. Tack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metal smelter activities have contaminated approximately 700 km2 of the Campine region in Belgium and The Netherlands. This work aimed to assess the effectiveness of biochar added to this soil using compost, peat or lime as a reference. Amendments were mixed with the contaminated soil at a 2 or 4% ratio (w:w) and equilibrated for up to 44 weeks. Treatment with biochar released significantly lower concentrations of Cd in the soil solution than compost or peat. In comparison to the blanks, soil solution concentrations of Cd were reduced 67% on average for the 4% biochar treatment and increased 30% and 231% for the 4% compost and 4% peat treatments, respectively. The lime treatment was equally effective as the biochar in reducing Cd concentrations. Similar trends were observed when conducting consecutive CaCl2 extractions. However, pH-stat leaching tests showed biochar and the other organic amendments to be more effective than lime in retaining Cd from the solution. The combined effect of pH and metal complexation capacity of added biochar resulted in an effective reduction in soluble Cd concentrations that lasted longer than when lime, compost or peat are used.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-130
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Geochemistry
Volume88
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Peat
Lime
compost
lime
peat
stabilization
Stabilization
Soils
soil
metal
Metals
Complexation
complexation
Leaching
leaching
contaminated soil
chemical
biochar

Keywords

  • Biochar
  • Compost
  • Peat
  • Soil amendment
  • Soil remediation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Van Poucke, R., Ainsworth, J., Maeseele, M., Ok, Y. S., Meers, E., & Tack, F. M. G. (2018). Chemical stabilization of Cd-contaminated soil using biochar. Applied Geochemistry, 88, 122-130. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2017.09.001

Chemical stabilization of Cd-contaminated soil using biochar. / Van Poucke, R.; Ainsworth, J.; Maeseele, M.; Ok, Yong Sik; Meers, E.; Tack, F. M.G.

In: Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 88, 01.01.2018, p. 122-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Van Poucke, R, Ainsworth, J, Maeseele, M, Ok, YS, Meers, E & Tack, FMG 2018, 'Chemical stabilization of Cd-contaminated soil using biochar', Applied Geochemistry, vol. 88, pp. 122-130. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2017.09.001
Van Poucke, R. ; Ainsworth, J. ; Maeseele, M. ; Ok, Yong Sik ; Meers, E. ; Tack, F. M.G. / Chemical stabilization of Cd-contaminated soil using biochar. In: Applied Geochemistry. 2018 ; Vol. 88. pp. 122-130.
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