Childhood abuse and cortical gray matter volume in patients with major depressive disorder

Soo Young Kim, Seong Joon An, Jong Hee Han, Youbin Kang, Eun Bit Bae, Woo Suk Tae, Byung Joo Ham, Kyu Man Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Childhood abuse is associated with brain structural alterations; however, few studies have investigated the association between specific types of childhood abuse and cortical volume in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). We aimed to investigate the association between specific types of childhood abuse and gray matter volumes in patients with MDD. Seventy-five participants with MDD and 97 healthy controls (HCs) aged 19–64 years were included. Cortical gray matter volumes were compared between MDD and HC groups, and also compared according to exposure to each type of specific childhood abuse. Emotional, sexual, and physical childhood abuse were assessed using the 28-item Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Patients with MDD showed a significantly decreased gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG). Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) was associated with significantly decreased gray matter volume in the right middle occipital gyrus (MOG). In the post-hoc comparison of volumes of the right ACG and MOG, MDD patients with CSA had significantly smaller volumes in the right MOG than did MDD patients without CSA or HCs. The right MOG volume decrease could be a neuroimaging marker associated with CSA and morphological changes in the brain may be involved in the pathophysiology of MDD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number114990
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume319
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Jan

Keywords

  • Childhood abuse
  • Cortical volume
  • Depression
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Major depressive disorder
  • Sexual abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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