Coffee intake and obesity: A meta-analysis

Ariel Lee, Woobin Lim, Seoyeon Kim, Hayeong Khil, Eugene Cheon, Soobin An, Sungeun Hong, Dong Hoon Lee, Seok Seong Kang, Hannah Oh, Nana Keum, Chung Cheng Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many studies have explored the relationship between coffee—one of the most commonly consumed beverages today—and obesity. Despite inconsistent results, the relationship has not been systematically summarized. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis by compiling data from 12 epidemiologic studies identified from PubMed and Embase through February 2019. The included studies assessed obesity by body mass index (BMI, a measure of overall adiposity) or waist circumference (WC, a measure of central adiposity); analyzed the measure as a continuous outcome or binary outcome. Using random effects model, weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were obtained for continuous outcomes; summary relative risk (RR) and 95% CI for the highest vs. lowest categories of coffee intake were estimated for binary outcome. For BMI, WMD was −0.08 (95% CI −0.14, −0.02); RR was 1.49 (95% CI 0.97, 2.29). For WC, WMD was −0.27 (95% CI −0.51, −0.02) and RR was 1.07 (95% CI 0.84, 1.36). In subgroup analysis by sex, evidence for an inverse association was more evident in men, specifically for continuous outcome, with WMD −0.05 (95% CI −0.09, −0.02) for BMI and −0.21 (95% CI −0.35, −0.08) for WC. Our meta-analysis suggests that higher coffee intake might be modestly associated with reduced adiposity, particularly in men.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1274
JournalNutrients
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Coffee
meta-analysis
Meta-Analysis
confidence interval
obesity
Obesity
Confidence Intervals
Adiposity
adiposity
relative risk
waist circumference
Beverages
Waist Circumference
PubMed
epidemiological studies
beverages
body mass index
Epidemiologic Studies
Body Mass Index
gender

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Body mass index
  • Coffee intake
  • Meta-analysis
  • Obesity
  • Waist circumference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Lee, A., Lim, W., Kim, S., Khil, H., Cheon, E., An, S., ... Hsieh, C. C. (2019). Coffee intake and obesity: A meta-analysis. Nutrients, 11(6), [1274]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061274

Coffee intake and obesity : A meta-analysis. / Lee, Ariel; Lim, Woobin; Kim, Seoyeon; Khil, Hayeong; Cheon, Eugene; An, Soobin; Hong, Sungeun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kang, Seok Seong; Oh, Hannah; Keum, Nana; Hsieh, Chung Cheng.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 6, 1274, 01.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Lee, A, Lim, W, Kim, S, Khil, H, Cheon, E, An, S, Hong, S, Lee, DH, Kang, SS, Oh, H, Keum, N & Hsieh, CC 2019, 'Coffee intake and obesity: A meta-analysis', Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 6, 1274. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061274
Lee A, Lim W, Kim S, Khil H, Cheon E, An S et al. Coffee intake and obesity: A meta-analysis. Nutrients. 2019 Jun 1;11(6). 1274. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061274
Lee, Ariel ; Lim, Woobin ; Kim, Seoyeon ; Khil, Hayeong ; Cheon, Eugene ; An, Soobin ; Hong, Sungeun ; Lee, Dong Hoon ; Kang, Seok Seong ; Oh, Hannah ; Keum, Nana ; Hsieh, Chung Cheng. / Coffee intake and obesity : A meta-analysis. In: Nutrients. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. 6.
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