Coffee or tea consumption and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis

Young Ho Lee, Sang Cheol Bae, Gwan Gyu Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyze published results for an association between coffee or tea intake and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the evidence for a relationship between coffee or tea consumption and the development of RA by performing a meta-analysis of the published results. Five studies (three cohort and two case–control studies) including 134,901 participants (1,279 cases of RA and 133,622 noncases) were considered in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of the cohort studies revealed a trend of an association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (relative risk [RR] of the highest versus the lowest group = 4.148, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.792–21.73, p = 0.092). Meta-analysis of case–control studies showed a significant association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (RR = 1.201, 95 % CI = 1.058–1.361, p = 0.005). Combining the data of the cohort and case–control studies showed a significant association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (RR = 2.426, 95 % CI = 1.060–5.554, p = 0.036). Meta-analysis stratified by seropositivity indicated a significant association between coffee consumption and seropositive RA risk (RR = 1.329, 95 % CI = 1.162–1.522, p = 3.5 × 10−5), but not seronegative RA risk (RR = 1.093, 95 % CI = 0.884–1.350, p = 0.411). No association was found between tea intake and RA incidence (RR = 0.880, 95 % CI = 0.624–1.239, p = 0.463). This meta-analysis of 134,901 participants (most of the participants were controls) suggests that high coffee consumption is associated with an elevated risk of RA development. The association between coffee and RA was found in seropositive RA, but not in seronegative RA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1575-1583
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Rheumatology
Volume33
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Coffee
Tea
Meta-Analysis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Confidence Intervals
Cohort Studies
Incidence

Keywords

  • Coffee
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Tea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Coffee or tea consumption and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis : a meta-analysis. / Lee, Young Ho; Bae, Sang Cheol; Song, Gwan Gyu.

In: Clinical Rheumatology, Vol. 33, No. 11, 01.01.2014, p. 1575-1583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5dd7a3aead4a449083ee4b9d0f6c244c,
title = "Coffee or tea consumption and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to analyze published results for an association between coffee or tea intake and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the evidence for a relationship between coffee or tea consumption and the development of RA by performing a meta-analysis of the published results. Five studies (three cohort and two case–control studies) including 134,901 participants (1,279 cases of RA and 133,622 noncases) were considered in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of the cohort studies revealed a trend of an association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (relative risk [RR] of the highest versus the lowest group = 4.148, 95 {\%} confidence interval [CI] = 0.792–21.73, p = 0.092). Meta-analysis of case–control studies showed a significant association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (RR = 1.201, 95 {\%} CI = 1.058–1.361, p = 0.005). Combining the data of the cohort and case–control studies showed a significant association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (RR = 2.426, 95 {\%} CI = 1.060–5.554, p = 0.036). Meta-analysis stratified by seropositivity indicated a significant association between coffee consumption and seropositive RA risk (RR = 1.329, 95 {\%} CI = 1.162–1.522, p = 3.5 × 10−5), but not seronegative RA risk (RR = 1.093, 95 {\%} CI = 0.884–1.350, p = 0.411). No association was found between tea intake and RA incidence (RR = 0.880, 95 {\%} CI = 0.624–1.239, p = 0.463). This meta-analysis of 134,901 participants (most of the participants were controls) suggests that high coffee consumption is associated with an elevated risk of RA development. The association between coffee and RA was found in seropositive RA, but not in seronegative RA.",
keywords = "Coffee, Rheumatoid arthritis, Tea",
author = "Lee, {Young Ho} and Bae, {Sang Cheol} and Song, {Gwan Gyu}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10067-014-2631-1",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "1575--1583",
journal = "Clinical Rheumatology",
issn = "0770-3198",
publisher = "Springer London",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Coffee or tea consumption and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis

T2 - a meta-analysis

AU - Lee, Young Ho

AU - Bae, Sang Cheol

AU - Song, Gwan Gyu

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The aim of this study was to analyze published results for an association between coffee or tea intake and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the evidence for a relationship between coffee or tea consumption and the development of RA by performing a meta-analysis of the published results. Five studies (three cohort and two case–control studies) including 134,901 participants (1,279 cases of RA and 133,622 noncases) were considered in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of the cohort studies revealed a trend of an association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (relative risk [RR] of the highest versus the lowest group = 4.148, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.792–21.73, p = 0.092). Meta-analysis of case–control studies showed a significant association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (RR = 1.201, 95 % CI = 1.058–1.361, p = 0.005). Combining the data of the cohort and case–control studies showed a significant association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (RR = 2.426, 95 % CI = 1.060–5.554, p = 0.036). Meta-analysis stratified by seropositivity indicated a significant association between coffee consumption and seropositive RA risk (RR = 1.329, 95 % CI = 1.162–1.522, p = 3.5 × 10−5), but not seronegative RA risk (RR = 1.093, 95 % CI = 0.884–1.350, p = 0.411). No association was found between tea intake and RA incidence (RR = 0.880, 95 % CI = 0.624–1.239, p = 0.463). This meta-analysis of 134,901 participants (most of the participants were controls) suggests that high coffee consumption is associated with an elevated risk of RA development. The association between coffee and RA was found in seropositive RA, but not in seronegative RA.

AB - The aim of this study was to analyze published results for an association between coffee or tea intake and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the evidence for a relationship between coffee or tea consumption and the development of RA by performing a meta-analysis of the published results. Five studies (three cohort and two case–control studies) including 134,901 participants (1,279 cases of RA and 133,622 noncases) were considered in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of the cohort studies revealed a trend of an association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (relative risk [RR] of the highest versus the lowest group = 4.148, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.792–21.73, p = 0.092). Meta-analysis of case–control studies showed a significant association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (RR = 1.201, 95 % CI = 1.058–1.361, p = 0.005). Combining the data of the cohort and case–control studies showed a significant association between total coffee intake and RA incidence (RR = 2.426, 95 % CI = 1.060–5.554, p = 0.036). Meta-analysis stratified by seropositivity indicated a significant association between coffee consumption and seropositive RA risk (RR = 1.329, 95 % CI = 1.162–1.522, p = 3.5 × 10−5), but not seronegative RA risk (RR = 1.093, 95 % CI = 0.884–1.350, p = 0.411). No association was found between tea intake and RA incidence (RR = 0.880, 95 % CI = 0.624–1.239, p = 0.463). This meta-analysis of 134,901 participants (most of the participants were controls) suggests that high coffee consumption is associated with an elevated risk of RA development. The association between coffee and RA was found in seropositive RA, but not in seronegative RA.

KW - Coffee

KW - Rheumatoid arthritis

KW - Tea

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84919333530&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84919333530&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10067-014-2631-1

DO - 10.1007/s10067-014-2631-1

M3 - Article

C2 - 24763752

AN - SCOPUS:84919333530

VL - 33

SP - 1575

EP - 1583

JO - Clinical Rheumatology

JF - Clinical Rheumatology

SN - 0770-3198

IS - 11

ER -