Cognitive behavioral therapy using a mobile application synchronizable with wearable devices for insomnia treatment: A pilot study

Seung Gul Kang, Jae Myeong Kang, Seong Jin Cho, Kwang Pil Ko, Yu Jin Lee, Heon Jeong Lee, Leen Kim, John W. Winkelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: The use of telemedicine with a mobile application (MA) and a wearable device (WD) for the management of sleep disorders has recently received considerable attention. We designed an MA synchronizable with a WD for insomnia treatment. Our pilot study determined the efficacy of simplified group cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered using our MA and assessed participant adherence to and satisfaction with the device. Methods: The efficacy of the CBT-I using MA (CBT-I-MA) was assessed by comparing sleep variables (sleep efficiency [SE], Insomnia Severity Index [ISI], and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory [PSQI] scores) before and after a 4-week treatment protocol in 19 patients with insomnia disorder patients. SE was assessed using a sleep diary, actigraphy, and the PSQI. Results: The intervention significantly improved all three measures of SE (P <.05), and the response rate to treatment was high (94.7%). Total ISI and PSQI scores and sleep latency, as measured by the sleep diary, improved significantly. Participants showed relatively good adherence to our MA, and sleep diary entries were made on 24.3 ± 3.8 of 28 days. Moreover, 94.7% of the participants reported that our MA was effective for treating insomnia. Conclusions: Our pilot study suggested the clinical usefulness of a CBT-I-MA. We expect that our findings will lead to further development and replication studies of CBT-I-MA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)633-640
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Insomnia
  • Mobile application
  • Telemedicine
  • Wearable device

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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