Columnar distribution of activity dependent gabaergic depolarization in sensorimotor cortical neurons

Jaekwang Lee, Junsung Woo, Oleg V. Favorov, Mark Tommerdahl, Changjoon Lee, Barry L. Whitsel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in CNS, has been demonstrated to paradoxically produce excitation even in mature brain. However activity-dependent form of GABA excitation in cortical neurons has not been observed. Here we report that after an intense electrical stimulation adult cortical neurons displayed a transient GABA excitation that lasted for about 30s. Results: Whole-cell patch recordings were performed to evaluate the effects of briefly applied GABA on pyramidal neurons in adult rodent sensorimotor cortical slice before and after 1 s, 20 Hz suprathreshold electrical stimulation of the junction between layer 6 and the underlying white matter (L6/WM stimulation). Immediately after L6/WM stimulation, GABA puffs produced neuronal depolarization in the center of the column-shaped region. However, both prior to or 30s after stimulation GABA puffs produced hyperpolarization of neurons. 2-photon imaging in neurons infected with adenovirus carrying a chloride sensor Clomeleon revealed that GABA induced depolarization is due to an increase in [Cl-]i after stimulation. To reveal the spatial extent of excitatory action of GABA, isoguvacine, a GABAA receptors agonist, was applied right after stimulation while monitoring the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in pyramidal neurons. Isoguvacine induced an increase in [Ca2+]i in pyramidal neurons especially in the center of the column but not in the peripheral regions of the column. The global pattern of the Ca2+ signal showed a column-shaped distribution along the stimulation site. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that the well-known inhibitory transmitter GABA rapidly switches from hyperpolarization to depolarization upon synaptic activity in adult somatosensory cortical neurons.

Original languageEnglish
Article number33
JournalMolecular Brain
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Sep 26
Externally publishedYes

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gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Neurons
Pyramidal Cells
Electric Stimulation
GABA-A Receptor Agonists
Patch-Clamp Techniques
Photons
Adenoviridae
Neurotransmitter Agents
Chlorides
Rodentia
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Molecular Biology

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Columnar distribution of activity dependent gabaergic depolarization in sensorimotor cortical neurons. / Lee, Jaekwang; Woo, Junsung; Favorov, Oleg V.; Tommerdahl, Mark; Lee, Changjoon; Whitsel, Barry L.

In: Molecular Brain, Vol. 5, No. 1, 33, 26.09.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Jaekwang ; Woo, Junsung ; Favorov, Oleg V. ; Tommerdahl, Mark ; Lee, Changjoon ; Whitsel, Barry L. / Columnar distribution of activity dependent gabaergic depolarization in sensorimotor cortical neurons. In: Molecular Brain. 2012 ; Vol. 5, No. 1.
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