Combination chemotherapy with methotrexate and vinblastine for surgically unresectable, aggressive fibromatosis

Kyong Hwa Park, Yoon Ji Choi, Kwan Woo Kim, Kyung Han Ro, Chang Ho Kang, Sang Heon Song, Jong Hoon Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To elucidate the clinical benefit and safety of low-dose chemotherapy using methotrexate and vinblastine in patients (mostly adults) with progressive and/or symptomatic fibromatosis.Methods: Patients were enrolled if they were treated with methotrexate and vinblastine chemotherapy for recurrences after surgical excision or newly diagnosed aggressive fibromatosis that was not amenable to surgical resection at the Korea University Medical Center from May 2008 to February 2016.Results: Twenty-two patients were treated with this regimen, and 21 were eligible for safety and efficacy analysis. Eleven (52%) of 21 patients showed a documented partial response (PR), and 11 showed stable disease (SD) by the end of treatment. All the patients who achieved PR reported a significant reduction in pain and improvement in the function of the affected lesions. Median progression-free survival was not reached at the time of analysis. The most common adverse event was abnormalities of the liver transaminases (overall 84.2%). The most common grade 3 or higher toxicity was neutropenia (36.8%), but no febrile neutropenic event was observed. The elevated levels of transaminases were normalized by reducing the dose of methotrexate or delaying treatment.Conclusions: Low-dose chemotherapy with methotrexate and vinblastine for 1 year was effective and well tolerated by adult patients with aggressive, recurrent fibromatosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)845-849
Number of pages5
JournalJapanese Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume46
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 1

Fingerprint

Aggressive Fibromatosis
Vinblastine
Combination Drug Therapy
Methotrexate
Transaminases
Drug Therapy
Safety
Fibroma
Korea
Neutropenia
Disease-Free Survival
Fever
Recurrence
Pain
Liver
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Aggressive fibromatosis
  • Chemotherapy
  • Methotrexate
  • Vinblastine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Combination chemotherapy with methotrexate and vinblastine for surgically unresectable, aggressive fibromatosis. / Park, Kyong Hwa; Choi, Yoon Ji; Kim, Kwan Woo; Ro, Kyung Han; Kang, Chang Ho; Song, Sang Heon; Park, Jong Hoon.

In: Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 46, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 845-849.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{860beb21b424424abdcf607f9cfd63ad,
title = "Combination chemotherapy with methotrexate and vinblastine for surgically unresectable, aggressive fibromatosis",
abstract = "Objective: To elucidate the clinical benefit and safety of low-dose chemotherapy using methotrexate and vinblastine in patients (mostly adults) with progressive and/or symptomatic fibromatosis.Methods: Patients were enrolled if they were treated with methotrexate and vinblastine chemotherapy for recurrences after surgical excision or newly diagnosed aggressive fibromatosis that was not amenable to surgical resection at the Korea University Medical Center from May 2008 to February 2016.Results: Twenty-two patients were treated with this regimen, and 21 were eligible for safety and efficacy analysis. Eleven (52{\%}) of 21 patients showed a documented partial response (PR), and 11 showed stable disease (SD) by the end of treatment. All the patients who achieved PR reported a significant reduction in pain and improvement in the function of the affected lesions. Median progression-free survival was not reached at the time of analysis. The most common adverse event was abnormalities of the liver transaminases (overall 84.2{\%}). The most common grade 3 or higher toxicity was neutropenia (36.8{\%}), but no febrile neutropenic event was observed. The elevated levels of transaminases were normalized by reducing the dose of methotrexate or delaying treatment.Conclusions: Low-dose chemotherapy with methotrexate and vinblastine for 1 year was effective and well tolerated by adult patients with aggressive, recurrent fibromatosis.",
keywords = "Aggressive fibromatosis, Chemotherapy, Methotrexate, Vinblastine",
author = "Park, {Kyong Hwa} and Choi, {Yoon Ji} and Kim, {Kwan Woo} and Ro, {Kyung Han} and Kang, {Chang Ho} and Song, {Sang Heon} and Park, {Jong Hoon}",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/jjco/hyw081",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "845--849",
journal = "Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology",
issn = "0368-2811",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Combination chemotherapy with methotrexate and vinblastine for surgically unresectable, aggressive fibromatosis

AU - Park, Kyong Hwa

AU - Choi, Yoon Ji

AU - Kim, Kwan Woo

AU - Ro, Kyung Han

AU - Kang, Chang Ho

AU - Song, Sang Heon

AU - Park, Jong Hoon

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - Objective: To elucidate the clinical benefit and safety of low-dose chemotherapy using methotrexate and vinblastine in patients (mostly adults) with progressive and/or symptomatic fibromatosis.Methods: Patients were enrolled if they were treated with methotrexate and vinblastine chemotherapy for recurrences after surgical excision or newly diagnosed aggressive fibromatosis that was not amenable to surgical resection at the Korea University Medical Center from May 2008 to February 2016.Results: Twenty-two patients were treated with this regimen, and 21 were eligible for safety and efficacy analysis. Eleven (52%) of 21 patients showed a documented partial response (PR), and 11 showed stable disease (SD) by the end of treatment. All the patients who achieved PR reported a significant reduction in pain and improvement in the function of the affected lesions. Median progression-free survival was not reached at the time of analysis. The most common adverse event was abnormalities of the liver transaminases (overall 84.2%). The most common grade 3 or higher toxicity was neutropenia (36.8%), but no febrile neutropenic event was observed. The elevated levels of transaminases were normalized by reducing the dose of methotrexate or delaying treatment.Conclusions: Low-dose chemotherapy with methotrexate and vinblastine for 1 year was effective and well tolerated by adult patients with aggressive, recurrent fibromatosis.

AB - Objective: To elucidate the clinical benefit and safety of low-dose chemotherapy using methotrexate and vinblastine in patients (mostly adults) with progressive and/or symptomatic fibromatosis.Methods: Patients were enrolled if they were treated with methotrexate and vinblastine chemotherapy for recurrences after surgical excision or newly diagnosed aggressive fibromatosis that was not amenable to surgical resection at the Korea University Medical Center from May 2008 to February 2016.Results: Twenty-two patients were treated with this regimen, and 21 were eligible for safety and efficacy analysis. Eleven (52%) of 21 patients showed a documented partial response (PR), and 11 showed stable disease (SD) by the end of treatment. All the patients who achieved PR reported a significant reduction in pain and improvement in the function of the affected lesions. Median progression-free survival was not reached at the time of analysis. The most common adverse event was abnormalities of the liver transaminases (overall 84.2%). The most common grade 3 or higher toxicity was neutropenia (36.8%), but no febrile neutropenic event was observed. The elevated levels of transaminases were normalized by reducing the dose of methotrexate or delaying treatment.Conclusions: Low-dose chemotherapy with methotrexate and vinblastine for 1 year was effective and well tolerated by adult patients with aggressive, recurrent fibromatosis.

KW - Aggressive fibromatosis

KW - Chemotherapy

KW - Methotrexate

KW - Vinblastine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84994106438&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84994106438&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/jjco/hyw081

DO - 10.1093/jjco/hyw081

M3 - Article

C2 - 27365524

AN - SCOPUS:84994106438

VL - 46

SP - 845

EP - 849

JO - Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology

JF - Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology

SN - 0368-2811

IS - 9

ER -