Combination treatment with aripiprazole and valproic acid for acute mania: An 8-week, single-blind, randomized controlled trial

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Abstract

Objectives: Despite the fact that combination treatment for patients with acute bipolar is prevalent in clinical practice, the outcomes of adjunct treatment with aripiprazole and a mood stabilizer have rarely been reported. The aim of this single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was to investigate treatment efficacy and safety of aripiprazole as an adjunct to valproic acid (Ari+Val), compared with haloperidol plus valproic acid (Hal+Val), in acute manic patients. Methods: Treatment efficacy was prospectively assessed for 8 weeks in 42 patients with acute mania using the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of illness scale. Emergent adverse events were assessed by the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale and the Liverpool University Neuroleptic Side Effect Rating Scale. Results: Both Ari+Val and Hal+Val produced a high rate of response (85.7% and 92.9%, respectively) and remission (82.1% and 85.7%, respectively) after the 8-week trial. Changes in the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of illness scale over the study period and time to remission and response were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Patients treated with Ari+Val showed significantly fewer extrapyramidal adverse events than those treated with Hal+Val (t = -2.048, F = 40, P = 0.048). However, significant weight gain was more prevalent in the Ari+Val group than the Hal+Val group (t = 2.055, F = 40, P = 0.046). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both combination strategies with Ari+Val and Hal+Val are beneficial for acute manic episode. Although patients receiving Ari+Val showed fewer extrapyramidal symptoms than those taking Hal+Val, careful consideration of adverse events such as weight gain and sedation is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-102
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Neuropharmacology
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 May 1

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Valproic Acid
Bipolar Disorder
Randomized Controlled Trials
Weight Gain
Therapeutics
Haloperidol
Antipsychotic Agents
Aripiprazole
Safety
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • adverse effect
  • aripiprazole
  • bipolar disorder
  • combination treatment
  • efficacy
  • haloperidol
  • valproic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Combination treatment with aripiprazole and valproic acid for acute mania: An 8-week, single-blind, randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Objectives: Despite the fact that combination treatment for patients with acute bipolar is prevalent in clinical practice, the outcomes of adjunct treatment with aripiprazole and a mood stabilizer have rarely been reported. The aim of this single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was to investigate treatment efficacy and safety of aripiprazole as an adjunct to valproic acid (Ari+Val), compared with haloperidol plus valproic acid (Hal+Val), in acute manic patients. Methods: Treatment efficacy was prospectively assessed for 8 weeks in 42 patients with acute mania using the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of illness scale. Emergent adverse events were assessed by the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale and the Liverpool University Neuroleptic Side Effect Rating Scale. Results: Both Ari+Val and Hal+Val produced a high rate of response (85.7{\%} and 92.9{\%}, respectively) and remission (82.1{\%} and 85.7{\%}, respectively) after the 8-week trial. Changes in the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of illness scale over the study period and time to remission and response were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Patients treated with Ari+Val showed significantly fewer extrapyramidal adverse events than those treated with Hal+Val (t = -2.048, F = 40, P = 0.048). However, significant weight gain was more prevalent in the Ari+Val group than the Hal+Val group (t = 2.055, F = 40, P = 0.046). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both combination strategies with Ari+Val and Hal+Val are beneficial for acute manic episode. Although patients receiving Ari+Val showed fewer extrapyramidal symptoms than those taking Hal+Val, careful consideration of adverse events such as weight gain and sedation is warranted.",
keywords = "adverse effect, aripiprazole, bipolar disorder, combination treatment, efficacy, haloperidol, valproic acid",
author = "Hyun-Ghang Jeong and Moon-Soo Lee and Young-Hoon Ko and Changsu Han and Jung, {In Kwa}",
year = "2012",
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language = "English",
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pages = "97--102",
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T1 - Combination treatment with aripiprazole and valproic acid for acute mania

T2 - An 8-week, single-blind, randomized controlled trial

AU - Jeong, Hyun-Ghang

AU - Lee, Moon-Soo

AU - Ko, Young-Hoon

AU - Han, Changsu

AU - Jung, In Kwa

PY - 2012/5/1

Y1 - 2012/5/1

N2 - Objectives: Despite the fact that combination treatment for patients with acute bipolar is prevalent in clinical practice, the outcomes of adjunct treatment with aripiprazole and a mood stabilizer have rarely been reported. The aim of this single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was to investigate treatment efficacy and safety of aripiprazole as an adjunct to valproic acid (Ari+Val), compared with haloperidol plus valproic acid (Hal+Val), in acute manic patients. Methods: Treatment efficacy was prospectively assessed for 8 weeks in 42 patients with acute mania using the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of illness scale. Emergent adverse events were assessed by the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale and the Liverpool University Neuroleptic Side Effect Rating Scale. Results: Both Ari+Val and Hal+Val produced a high rate of response (85.7% and 92.9%, respectively) and remission (82.1% and 85.7%, respectively) after the 8-week trial. Changes in the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of illness scale over the study period and time to remission and response were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Patients treated with Ari+Val showed significantly fewer extrapyramidal adverse events than those treated with Hal+Val (t = -2.048, F = 40, P = 0.048). However, significant weight gain was more prevalent in the Ari+Val group than the Hal+Val group (t = 2.055, F = 40, P = 0.046). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both combination strategies with Ari+Val and Hal+Val are beneficial for acute manic episode. Although patients receiving Ari+Val showed fewer extrapyramidal symptoms than those taking Hal+Val, careful consideration of adverse events such as weight gain and sedation is warranted.

AB - Objectives: Despite the fact that combination treatment for patients with acute bipolar is prevalent in clinical practice, the outcomes of adjunct treatment with aripiprazole and a mood stabilizer have rarely been reported. The aim of this single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was to investigate treatment efficacy and safety of aripiprazole as an adjunct to valproic acid (Ari+Val), compared with haloperidol plus valproic acid (Hal+Val), in acute manic patients. Methods: Treatment efficacy was prospectively assessed for 8 weeks in 42 patients with acute mania using the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of illness scale. Emergent adverse events were assessed by the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale and the Liverpool University Neuroleptic Side Effect Rating Scale. Results: Both Ari+Val and Hal+Val produced a high rate of response (85.7% and 92.9%, respectively) and remission (82.1% and 85.7%, respectively) after the 8-week trial. Changes in the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of illness scale over the study period and time to remission and response were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Patients treated with Ari+Val showed significantly fewer extrapyramidal adverse events than those treated with Hal+Val (t = -2.048, F = 40, P = 0.048). However, significant weight gain was more prevalent in the Ari+Val group than the Hal+Val group (t = 2.055, F = 40, P = 0.046). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both combination strategies with Ari+Val and Hal+Val are beneficial for acute manic episode. Although patients receiving Ari+Val showed fewer extrapyramidal symptoms than those taking Hal+Val, careful consideration of adverse events such as weight gain and sedation is warranted.

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KW - bipolar disorder

KW - combination treatment

KW - efficacy

KW - haloperidol

KW - valproic acid

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