Comparison between source-induced dissociation and collision-induced dissociation of ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and oxytetracycline via mass spectrometry

Seung Ha Lee, DalWoong Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mass spectrometry (MS) is a very powerful instrument that can be used to analyze a wide range of materials such as proteins, peptides, DNA, drugs, and polymers. The process typically involves either chemical or electron (impact) ionization of the analyte. The resulting charged species or fragment is subsequently identified by the detector. Usually, single mass uses source-induced dissociation (SID), whereas mass/mass uses collision-induced dissociation (CID) to analyze the chemical fragmentations Each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. While CID is most effective for the analysis of pure substances, multiple- step MS is a powerful technique to get structural data. Analysis of veterinary drugs ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and oxytetracycline serves to highlight the slight differences between SID and CID. For example, minor differences were observed between ciprofloxacin and oxytetracycline via SID or CID. However, distinct fragmentation patterns were observed for ampicllin depending on the analysis method. Both SID and CID showed similar fragmentation spectra but different signal intensities for chloramphenicol. There are several factors that can influence the fragmentation spectra, such as the collision energy, major precursor ion, electrospray mode (positive or negative), and sample homogeneity. Therefore, one must select a fragmentation method on an empirical and case-by-case basis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-114
Number of pages8
JournalToxicological Research
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Oct 29

Fingerprint

Oxytetracycline
Chloramphenicol
Ampicillin
Ciprofloxacin
Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Veterinary Drugs
Polymers
Electrons
Ions
Peptides
DNA
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Proteins
Impact ionization
Detectors

Keywords

  • Ampicillin
  • Chloramphenicol
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Oxytetracycline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

@article{54e09d4bfaf04277a5f3d30d4814fd86,
title = "Comparison between source-induced dissociation and collision-induced dissociation of ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and oxytetracycline via mass spectrometry",
abstract = "Mass spectrometry (MS) is a very powerful instrument that can be used to analyze a wide range of materials such as proteins, peptides, DNA, drugs, and polymers. The process typically involves either chemical or electron (impact) ionization of the analyte. The resulting charged species or fragment is subsequently identified by the detector. Usually, single mass uses source-induced dissociation (SID), whereas mass/mass uses collision-induced dissociation (CID) to analyze the chemical fragmentations Each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. While CID is most effective for the analysis of pure substances, multiple- step MS is a powerful technique to get structural data. Analysis of veterinary drugs ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and oxytetracycline serves to highlight the slight differences between SID and CID. For example, minor differences were observed between ciprofloxacin and oxytetracycline via SID or CID. However, distinct fragmentation patterns were observed for ampicllin depending on the analysis method. Both SID and CID showed similar fragmentation spectra but different signal intensities for chloramphenicol. There are several factors that can influence the fragmentation spectra, such as the collision energy, major precursor ion, electrospray mode (positive or negative), and sample homogeneity. Therefore, one must select a fragmentation method on an empirical and case-by-case basis.",
keywords = "Ampicillin, Chloramphenicol, Ciprofloxacin, Mass spectrometry, Oxytetracycline",
author = "Lee, {Seung Ha} and DalWoong Choi",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
day = "29",
doi = "10.5487/TR.2013.29.2.107",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "107--114",
journal = "Toxicological Research",
issn = "1976-8257",
publisher = "Koreal Association of Medical Journal Editors",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison between source-induced dissociation and collision-induced dissociation of ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and oxytetracycline via mass spectrometry

AU - Lee, Seung Ha

AU - Choi, DalWoong

PY - 2013/10/29

Y1 - 2013/10/29

N2 - Mass spectrometry (MS) is a very powerful instrument that can be used to analyze a wide range of materials such as proteins, peptides, DNA, drugs, and polymers. The process typically involves either chemical or electron (impact) ionization of the analyte. The resulting charged species or fragment is subsequently identified by the detector. Usually, single mass uses source-induced dissociation (SID), whereas mass/mass uses collision-induced dissociation (CID) to analyze the chemical fragmentations Each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. While CID is most effective for the analysis of pure substances, multiple- step MS is a powerful technique to get structural data. Analysis of veterinary drugs ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and oxytetracycline serves to highlight the slight differences between SID and CID. For example, minor differences were observed between ciprofloxacin and oxytetracycline via SID or CID. However, distinct fragmentation patterns were observed for ampicllin depending on the analysis method. Both SID and CID showed similar fragmentation spectra but different signal intensities for chloramphenicol. There are several factors that can influence the fragmentation spectra, such as the collision energy, major precursor ion, electrospray mode (positive or negative), and sample homogeneity. Therefore, one must select a fragmentation method on an empirical and case-by-case basis.

AB - Mass spectrometry (MS) is a very powerful instrument that can be used to analyze a wide range of materials such as proteins, peptides, DNA, drugs, and polymers. The process typically involves either chemical or electron (impact) ionization of the analyte. The resulting charged species or fragment is subsequently identified by the detector. Usually, single mass uses source-induced dissociation (SID), whereas mass/mass uses collision-induced dissociation (CID) to analyze the chemical fragmentations Each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. While CID is most effective for the analysis of pure substances, multiple- step MS is a powerful technique to get structural data. Analysis of veterinary drugs ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and oxytetracycline serves to highlight the slight differences between SID and CID. For example, minor differences were observed between ciprofloxacin and oxytetracycline via SID or CID. However, distinct fragmentation patterns were observed for ampicllin depending on the analysis method. Both SID and CID showed similar fragmentation spectra but different signal intensities for chloramphenicol. There are several factors that can influence the fragmentation spectra, such as the collision energy, major precursor ion, electrospray mode (positive or negative), and sample homogeneity. Therefore, one must select a fragmentation method on an empirical and case-by-case basis.

KW - Ampicillin

KW - Chloramphenicol

KW - Ciprofloxacin

KW - Mass spectrometry

KW - Oxytetracycline

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84886292092&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84886292092&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5487/TR.2013.29.2.107

DO - 10.5487/TR.2013.29.2.107

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84886292092

VL - 29

SP - 107

EP - 114

JO - Toxicological Research

JF - Toxicological Research

SN - 1976-8257

IS - 2

ER -