Comparison of ozone pollution levels at various sites in Seoul, a megacity in Northeast Asia

Mohammad Asif Iqbal, Ki Hyun Kim, Zang Ho Shon, Jong Ryeul Sohn, Eui Chan Jeon, Yoon Shin Kim, Jong Min Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Concentrations of ozone were continuously measured at four urban monitoring sites (Gu Ro (G); No Won (N); Song Pa (S); and Yong San (Y)) in Seoul, Korea from 2009 to 2011. The annual mean concentrations of ozone (in ppb) at these sites were found on the order of N (21.8±19.3)>S (21.4±20.14)>G (20.9±18.0)>Y (18.8±17.4). During peak hours (12-6pm), the ozone concentrations were significantly higher (75, 69, 67, and 64% at site S, Y, N, and G, respectively) than overall 24hour mean values. Seasonal variations of ozone have quite similar patterns at every site with systematic increases during spring (March-May) and summer (June-August) with the summer daytime mean (12-6pm) values of 40.7 (site Y)-49.3ppb (site S). The concentrations of ozone exhibited strong inverse correlations with other criteria pollutants (e.g., oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide), while a significant positive correlation was observed with some meteorological parameters (e.g., ultraviolet ray and solar radiation). Evidence collected in this study confirm that the spatio-temporal distribution of ozone in the study areas should be affected by the anthropogenic sources (e.g., vehicles, residential, and industrial sources) in concert with such well-known variables as the NOx-VOC chemistry and a number of natural parameters (e.g., wind speed, geographic position, and solar radiation).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-345
Number of pages16
JournalAtmospheric Research
Volume138
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Mar 1

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megacity
ozone
pollution
solar radiation
summer
anthropogenic source
song
carbon monoxide
temporal distribution
volatile organic compound
comparison
Asia
seasonal variation
wind velocity
oxide
pollutant
monitoring

Keywords

  • Fossil fuel
  • Ozone level
  • Seoul
  • Solar radiation (SR)
  • Trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Comparison of ozone pollution levels at various sites in Seoul, a megacity in Northeast Asia. / Iqbal, Mohammad Asif; Kim, Ki Hyun; Shon, Zang Ho; Sohn, Jong Ryeul; Jeon, Eui Chan; Kim, Yoon Shin; Oh, Jong Min.

In: Atmospheric Research, Vol. 138, 01.03.2014, p. 330-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iqbal, Mohammad Asif ; Kim, Ki Hyun ; Shon, Zang Ho ; Sohn, Jong Ryeul ; Jeon, Eui Chan ; Kim, Yoon Shin ; Oh, Jong Min. / Comparison of ozone pollution levels at various sites in Seoul, a megacity in Northeast Asia. In: Atmospheric Research. 2014 ; Vol. 138. pp. 330-345.
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