Comparison of the long-term immunogenicity of two pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 vaccines, the MF59-adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccines, in adults

Joon-Young Song, Hee-Jin Cheong, Yu Bin Seo, In Seon Kim, Ji Yun Noh, Jung Yeon Heo, Wonseok Choi, Jacob Lee, Woo Joo Kima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since the first reports of the A/H1N1 virus in April 2009, the pandemic influenza virus spread globally and circulated for a long time. The primary method for the control of influenza is vaccination, but levels of influenza vaccine-induced antibody are known to decline rapidly during a 6-month period. In adults aged 18 to 64 years, we compared the long-term immunogenicity of two of the influenza A/H1N1 2009 monovalent vaccines, 3.75-μg MF59-adjuvanted vaccine and 15-μg unadjuvanted vaccine. The serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) titers were determined prevaccination and at 1, 6, and 10 months after vaccination. One hundred six (88.3%) of the 120 subjects were monitored for the entire 10-month period after receiving the influenza A/H1N1 2009 monovalent vaccine. There were 60 patients who received the unadjuvanted vaccine and 46 patients who received the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine. The seroprotection rates, seroconversion rates, and the geometric mean titer (GMT) folds fulfilled the criteria of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) at 1 month after vaccination irrespective of the vaccine composition. Although the GMTs at 1 month postvaccination were somewhat higher in the unadjuvanted vaccine recipients than in the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine recipients, the difference was not significant (P=0.29). The seroprotection rates at 6 and 10 months postvaccination were preserved above 70% but only in the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine recipients. In conclusion, low-dose MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine, even with 3.75μg hemagglutinin antigen, might induce excellent long-term immunity that is comparable to the conventional dose of unadjuvanted vaccine among healthy adults aged 18 to 64 years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)638-641
Number of pages4
JournalClinical and Vaccine Immunology
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 May 1

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Pandemics
Human Influenza
Vaccines
Vaccination
Influenza Vaccines
Hemagglutinins
Viruses
MF59 oil emulsion
H1N1 Subtype Influenza A Virus
Orthomyxoviridae
Medicine
Immunity
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Comparison of the long-term immunogenicity of two pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 vaccines, the MF59-adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccines, in adults. / Song, Joon-Young; Cheong, Hee-Jin; Seo, Yu Bin; Kim, In Seon; Noh, Ji Yun; Heo, Jung Yeon; Choi, Wonseok; Lee, Jacob; Kima, Woo Joo.

In: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, Vol. 19, No. 5, 01.05.2012, p. 638-641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Since the first reports of the A/H1N1 virus in April 2009, the pandemic influenza virus spread globally and circulated for a long time. The primary method for the control of influenza is vaccination, but levels of influenza vaccine-induced antibody are known to decline rapidly during a 6-month period. In adults aged 18 to 64 years, we compared the long-term immunogenicity of two of the influenza A/H1N1 2009 monovalent vaccines, 3.75-μg MF59-adjuvanted vaccine and 15-μg unadjuvanted vaccine. The serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) titers were determined prevaccination and at 1, 6, and 10 months after vaccination. One hundred six (88.3{\%}) of the 120 subjects were monitored for the entire 10-month period after receiving the influenza A/H1N1 2009 monovalent vaccine. There were 60 patients who received the unadjuvanted vaccine and 46 patients who received the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine. The seroprotection rates, seroconversion rates, and the geometric mean titer (GMT) folds fulfilled the criteria of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) at 1 month after vaccination irrespective of the vaccine composition. Although the GMTs at 1 month postvaccination were somewhat higher in the unadjuvanted vaccine recipients than in the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine recipients, the difference was not significant (P=0.29). The seroprotection rates at 6 and 10 months postvaccination were preserved above 70{\%} but only in the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine recipients. In conclusion, low-dose MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine, even with 3.75μg hemagglutinin antigen, might induce excellent long-term immunity that is comparable to the conventional dose of unadjuvanted vaccine among healthy adults aged 18 to 64 years.",
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