Complementary and alternative medicine in the undergraduate medical curriculum: A survey of Korean medical schools

Do Yeun Kim, Wan Beom Park, Hee Cheol Kang, Mi Jung Kim, Kyu Hyun Park, Byung Il Min, Duk Joon Suh, Hye Won Lee, Seung Pil Jung, Mison Chun, Soon Nam Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The current status of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) education in Korean medical schools is still largely unknown, despite a growing need for a CAM component in medical education. The prevalence, scope, and diversity of CAM courses in Korean medical school education were evaluated. Design: Participants included academic or curriculum deans and faculty at each of the 41 Korean medical schools. A mail survey was conducted from 2007 to 2010. Replies were received from all 41 schools. Results: CAM was officially taught at 35 schools (85.4%), and 32 schools (91.4%) provided academic credit for CAM courses. The most common courses were introduction to CAM or integrative medicine (88.6%), traditional Korean medicine (57.1%), homeopathy and naturopathy (31.4%), and acupuncture (28.6%). Educational formats included lectures by professors and lectures and/or demonstrations by practitioners. The value order of core competencies was attitude (40/41), knowledge (32/41), and skill (6/41). Reasons for not initiating a CAM curriculum were a non-evidence-based approach in assessing the efficacy of CAM, insufficiently reliable reference resources, and insufficient time to educate students in CAM. Conclusions: This survey reveals heterogeneity in the content, format, and requirements among CAM courses at Korean medical schools. Korean medical school students should be instructed in CAM with a more consistent educational approach to help patients who participate in or demand CAM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)870-874
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Sep 1

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Complementary Therapies
Medical Schools
Curriculum
Surveys and Questionnaires
Medical Education
Korean Traditional Medicine
Naturopathy
Integrative Medicine
Homeopathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Complementary and alternative medicine in the undergraduate medical curriculum : A survey of Korean medical schools. / Kim, Do Yeun; Park, Wan Beom; Kang, Hee Cheol; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Kyu Hyun; Min, Byung Il; Suh, Duk Joon; Lee, Hye Won; Jung, Seung Pil; Chun, Mison; Lee, Soon Nam.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 9, 01.09.2012, p. 870-874.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kim, Do Yeun ; Park, Wan Beom ; Kang, Hee Cheol ; Kim, Mi Jung ; Park, Kyu Hyun ; Min, Byung Il ; Suh, Duk Joon ; Lee, Hye Won ; Jung, Seung Pil ; Chun, Mison ; Lee, Soon Nam. / Complementary and alternative medicine in the undergraduate medical curriculum : A survey of Korean medical schools. In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 18, No. 9. pp. 870-874.
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