Congenital defect of the vomer bone

A rare cause of septal perforation

Hee Joon Kang, Hyun Woo Lim, Soon Jae Hwang, Heung Man Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Congenital anomalies of the nasal septum besides septal deviation are very rare, and few cases of congenital defect of the vomer have been reported. We present a case of a 13-year-old boy who had a defect in the posteroinferior aspect of the nasal septum that was discovered incidentally during diagnostic work-up for chronic sinusitis. The patient had no history of maxillofacial trauma, drug abuse and had not previously undergone nasal surgery or cautery for epistaxis, and showed no evidence of systemic inflammatory disease. Based on the patient's history and laboratory findings, the septal defect is thought to be due to a congenital defect of the vomer bone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-19
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Extra
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Vomer
Nasal Septum
Nasal Surgical Procedures
Cautery
Bone and Bones
Epistaxis
Sinusitis
Substance-Related Disorders
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Congenital
  • Septal perforation
  • Vomer defect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Congenital defect of the vomer bone : A rare cause of septal perforation. / Kang, Hee Joon; Lim, Hyun Woo; Hwang, Soon Jae; Lee, Heung Man.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Extra, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.03.2007, p. 17-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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