Controlled cellular orientation on PLGA microfibers with defined diameters

C. M. Hwang, Yongdoo Park, J. Y. Park, K. Lee, Kyung Sun, A. Khademhosseini, Sang Hoon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the effects of the diameter of microfibers on the orientation (angle between cells' major axis and the substrate fiber long axis) of adhered cells. For this purpose, mouse fibroblast L929 cells were cultured on the surface of PLGA fibers of defined diameters ranging from 10 to 242 μm, and their adhesion and alignment was quantitatively analyzed. It was found that the mean orientation of cells and the spatial variation of cell alignment angle directly related to the microfiber diameter. Cells that were cultured on microfibrous scaffolds oriented along the long axis of the microfiber and the orientation increased as the fiber diameter decreased. For the fiber diameter of 10 μm, the mean orientation was 3.0 ± 0.2° (mean ± SE), whereas for a diameter of 242 μm, it decreased to 37.7 ± 2.1°. Using these studies we demonstrate that fibroblasts have a characteristic alignment on microscale fibers and that the microscale fiber diameter plays a critical role in cellular orientation. The ability to control cellular alignment on engineered tissue scaffold can be a potentially powerful approach to recreate the microscale architecture of engineered tissues. This may be important for engineering a variety of human tissues such as tendon, muscle and nerves as well as applications in 3D tissue culture and drug screening.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)739-746
Number of pages8
JournalBiomedical Microdevices
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Feb 26

Fingerprint

Fibers
Cultured Cells
Fibroblasts
Tissue Scaffolds
Preclinical Drug Evaluations
Tendons
Tissue
Tissue culture
Scaffolds
Muscles
Muscle
polylactic acid-polyglycolic acid copolymer
Screening
Adhesion
Substrates

Keywords

  • Cell orientation
  • Fibroblasts
  • Focal contact
  • PLGA fibers
  • Scaffold

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Controlled cellular orientation on PLGA microfibers with defined diameters. / Hwang, C. M.; Park, Yongdoo; Park, J. Y.; Lee, K.; Sun, Kyung; Khademhosseini, A.; Lee, Sang Hoon.

In: Biomedical Microdevices, Vol. 11, No. 4, 26.02.2009, p. 739-746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hwang, C. M. ; Park, Yongdoo ; Park, J. Y. ; Lee, K. ; Sun, Kyung ; Khademhosseini, A. ; Lee, Sang Hoon. / Controlled cellular orientation on PLGA microfibers with defined diameters. In: Biomedical Microdevices. 2009 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 739-746.
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