Convertible operation techniques for pump stations sharing centralized reservoirs for improving resilience in urban drainage systems

Eui Hoon Lee, Joong Hoon Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pump stations prevent backwater effects from urban streams and safely drain rainwater in urban areas. Urbanization has increased the required capacity of centralized reservoirs and drainage pumps; yet, their respective designs are based on the runoff of the target watershed at the time of design. In Korea, additional pump stations are constructed to supplement the insufficient capacity of centralized reservoirs and drainage pumps. Two pump stations in the same drainage area share centralized reservoirs, and there are gates between them. Operation of the gates and drainage pumps is based on the water level in the connected centralized reservoirs. The convertible operation is based on changes in flow between two pump stations with different effluent streams in shared centralized reservoirs. Efficient distribution of inflow to both pump stations provides additional storage capacity in centralized reservoirs and rapid drainage. For a rainfall event in 2010, flooding volumes for current and convertible operations were 58,750 and 7507 m3, respectively. For an event in 2011, the corresponding figures were 3697 and 471 m3. This shows that resilience increased by 0.10829 and 0.00756, respectively, for the two events. Accordingly, a new technique to operate multiple pump stations for reducing urban inundation is proposed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number843
JournalWater (Switzerland)
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Oct 31

Keywords

  • Centralized reservoirs
  • Convertible operation
  • Gate operation
  • Pump operation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Aquatic Science
  • Water Science and Technology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Convertible operation techniques for pump stations sharing centralized reservoirs for improving resilience in urban drainage systems'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this