Correlation between skin-prick testing, individual specific IgE tests, and a multiallergen IgE assay for allergy detection in patients with chronic rhinitis

Jae Hoon Cho, Jeffrey D. Suh, Jin Kook Kim, Seok Chan Hong, Il Ho Park, Heung Man Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Allergy test results can differ based on the method used. The most common tests include skin-prick testing (SPT) and in vitro tests to detect allergen-specific IgE. This study was designed to assess allergy test results using SPT, individual specific IgE tests, and a multiallergen IgE assay (multiple allergen simultaneous test) in patients with chronic rhinitis and controls.

Methods: One hundred forty total patients were prospectively enrolled in the study, including 100 patients with chronic rhinitis and 40 control patients without atopy. All eligible patients underwent SPT, serum analysis using individual specific IgE test, and multiple allergen simultaneous test against 10 common allergens. Allergy test results were then compared to identify correlation and interest agreement.

Results: There was an 81-97% agreement between SPT and individual specific IgE test in allergen detection and an 80-98% agreement between SPT and multiple allergen simultaneous test. Individual specific IgE test and multiple allergen simultaneous test allergy detection prevalence was generally similar to SPT in patients with chronic rhinitis. All control patients had negative SPT (0/40), but low positive results were found with both individual specific IgE test (5-12.5%) and multiple allergen simultaneous test (2.5-7.5%) to some allergens, especially cockroach, Dermatophagoides farina, and ragweed. Agreement and correlation between individual specific IgE test and multiple allergen simultaneous test were good to excellent for a majority of tested allergens.

Conclusion: This study shows good agreement and correlation between SPT with individual specific IgE test and multiple allergen simultaneous test on a majority of the tested allergens for patients with chronic rhinitis. Comparing the two in vitro tests, individual specific IgE test agrees with SPT better than multiple allergen simultaneous test.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)388-391
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Rhinology and Allergy
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Rhinitis
Allergens
Immunoglobulin E
Hypersensitivity
Skin
Dermatophagoides farinae
Ambrosia
Cockroaches
Skin Tests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Correlation between skin-prick testing, individual specific IgE tests, and a multiallergen IgE assay for allergy detection in patients with chronic rhinitis. / Cho, Jae Hoon; Suh, Jeffrey D.; Kim, Jin Kook; Hong, Seok Chan; Park, Il Ho; Lee, Heung Man.

In: American Journal of Rhinology and Allergy, Vol. 28, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 388-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Allergy test results can differ based on the method used. The most common tests include skin-prick testing (SPT) and in vitro tests to detect allergen-specific IgE. This study was designed to assess allergy test results using SPT, individual specific IgE tests, and a multiallergen IgE assay (multiple allergen simultaneous test) in patients with chronic rhinitis and controls.Methods: One hundred forty total patients were prospectively enrolled in the study, including 100 patients with chronic rhinitis and 40 control patients without atopy. All eligible patients underwent SPT, serum analysis using individual specific IgE test, and multiple allergen simultaneous test against 10 common allergens. Allergy test results were then compared to identify correlation and interest agreement.Results: There was an 81-97{\%} agreement between SPT and individual specific IgE test in allergen detection and an 80-98{\%} agreement between SPT and multiple allergen simultaneous test. Individual specific IgE test and multiple allergen simultaneous test allergy detection prevalence was generally similar to SPT in patients with chronic rhinitis. All control patients had negative SPT (0/40), but low positive results were found with both individual specific IgE test (5-12.5{\%}) and multiple allergen simultaneous test (2.5-7.5{\%}) to some allergens, especially cockroach, Dermatophagoides farina, and ragweed. Agreement and correlation between individual specific IgE test and multiple allergen simultaneous test were good to excellent for a majority of tested allergens.Conclusion: This study shows good agreement and correlation between SPT with individual specific IgE test and multiple allergen simultaneous test on a majority of the tested allergens for patients with chronic rhinitis. Comparing the two in vitro tests, individual specific IgE test agrees with SPT better than multiple allergen simultaneous test.",
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